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Full text of "Savannah State University Graduate Catalog 2006-2008"

SAVANNAH STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

A Senior Unit of The University System of Georgia 




GRADUATE CATALOG 

2006-2008 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

A SENIOR, RESIDENTIAL UNIT OF 
THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 



GRADUATE CATALOG 

2006-2008 

Savannah, Georgia 31404 
Civil Rights Compliance 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

The University System of Georgia includes all state-operated institutions of higher 
education in Georgia; 19 universities, 2 four-year colleges, and 14 two-year colleges. These 
35 public institutions are located throughout the state. 

A 16-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System, which has 
been in operation since 1932. Appointment of board members - five from the state-at-large 
and one from each of the state's eleven congressional districts - are made by the governor, 
subject to confirmation by the State Senate. Regular terms of board members are seven 
years. 

The chairman, the vice chairman, and other officers of the Board are elected by the mem- 
bers of the Board. The chancellor, who is not a member of the Board, is the chief executive 
officer of the Board and the chief administrative officer of the University System. 

The overall programs and services of the university system are offered through three ma- 
jor components: instruction, public service/continuing education, and research. 

Instruction consists of programs of study leading toward degrees, ranging from the associ- 
ate (two-year) level to the doctoral level, and certificates. 

Requirements for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are 
determined, pursuant to policies to the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board 
establishes minimum academic standards and leaves to each institution the prerogative 
to establish higher standards. Applications for admission should be addressed in all cases 
to the institutions. 

A core curriculum, consisting of freshman and sophomore years of study for students whose 
educational goal is a degree beyond the associate level, is in effect at the universities, four- 
year colleges, and two-year colleges. This curriculum requires 60 semester credit hours, 
including 48 in general education — humanities, mathematics and natural sciences, and 
social sciences — and 18 in the student's chosen major area of study. It facilitates the 
transfer of freshman and sophomore degree credits within the University System. 

Public service/continuing education consists of non-degree activities, primarily, and spe- 
cial types of college-degree-credit courses. The non-degree activities are of several types, 
including short courses, seminars, conferences, lectures, and consultative and advisory 
services, in a large number of areas of interest. Typical college degree-credit public service/ 
continuing education courses are those offered through extension center programs and 
teacher education consortiums. 

Research encompasses investigations conducted primarily for discovery and application of 
knowledge. These investigations include clearly defined projects in some cases, non-pro- 
grammatic activities in other cases. They are conducted on campuses at many off-campus 
locations. 

The research investigations cover a large number and a large variety of matters related to 
the educational objectives of the institutions and to general societal needs. 

Most of the research is conducted through the universities; however, some of it is con- 
ducted through several of the four-year and two-year colleges. 

The policies of the Board of Regents for the government, management, and control of the 



University System and the administrative actions of the chancellor provide autonomy of 
high degree for each institution. The executive head of each institution is the president, 
whose election is recommended by the chancellor and approved by the Board. 

The University System Advisory Council, with 34 committees, engenders continual system 
wide dialogue on major academic and administrative matters of all types. It also makes 
recommendations to the chancellor for transmittal to the Board of Regents as appropriate, 
regarding academic and administrative aspects of operation of the system. 

The advisory council consists of the chancellor, the vice chancellor, and all presidents as 
voting members, and it includes other officials and staff members of the institutions as 
nonvoting members. The advisory council's 21 academic committees and 13 administra- 
tive committees are made up of representatives from the institutions. The committees 
dealing with matters of university-system-wide application include, typically, at least one 
member from each institution. 





UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

Hugh A. Carter, Jr., Atlanta State at Large, 2009 

Connie Cater, Macon Eighth District, 2006 

William H. Cleveland, Atlanta State at Large, 2009 

Michael J. Coles, Kennesaw Sixth District, 2008 

Joe Frank Harris, Cartersville (CHAIR) Seventh District, 2006 

Julie Ewing Hunt, Tifton, Second District, 2011 

W. Mansfield Jennings, Jr., Hawkinsville First District, 2010 

James R. Jolly, Dalton Tenth District, 2008 

Donald M. Leebern, Jr., Atlanta State-at-Large, 2012 

Elridge W. McMillan, Atlanta Fifth District, 2010 

Martin W. NeSmith, Claxton First District, 2006 

Patrick S. Pittard, Atlanta Ninth District, 2008 

Doreen Stiles Poitevint, Bainbridge State-at-Large, 2011 

Wanda Yancey Rodwell, Stone Mountain Fourth District, 2008 

Timothy J. Shelnut, Augusta Tenth District, 2007 

Richard L. Tucker, Lawrenceville Seventh District, 2012 

Allan Vigil, Morrow Thirteenth District, 2010 

Joel D. Wooten, Jr., Columbus State-at-Large, 2006 

University System Officers and Staff 

Joel D. Wooten, Chair 

Timothy J. Shelnut, Vice Chair 

Thomas C. Meredith, Chancellor 

Corlis Cummings, Senior Vice Chancellor for Support Services 

Thomas E. Daniel, Senior Vice Chancellor for External Affairs and Facilities 

Daniel S. Papp, Senior Vice Chancellor for Academics and Fiscal Affairs 

Frank A. Butler, Vice Chancellor for Academics, Faculty and Student Affairs 

William R. Bowes, Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Randall A. Thursby, Vice Chancellor for Information and Instructional Technology/CIO 

Cathie M. Hudson, Associate Vice Chancellor- Strategic Research & Analysis 

Elizabeth E. Neely, Associate Vice Chancellor of Legal Affairs 

Gail Weber, Secretary to Board/Executive Administrative Assistant 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 6 

President's Message 11 

Graduate Dean's Message 12 

Historical Overview 13 

Location 15 

Campus 16 

Mission and Goals 17 

Accreditations 19 

Administrative Officers 20 

College of Business Faculty and Staff 21 

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Faculty and Staff 21 

College of Sciences and Technology Faculty and Staff 21 

Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research Faculty and Staff 22 

Graduate Program Coordinators 22 

Student Affairs 23 

Disability Services 23 

Academic Policies and Procedures 24 

Academic Integrity 25 

Graduate Studies 26 

Summary of Department Admission Requirements 28 

Application Process 29 

Student Fees and Financial Policies 35 

Graduate Programs 38 

Master of Science in Marine Sciences 38 

Master of Public Administration 44 

Master of Social Work 50 

Master of Science in Urban Studies 54 

Course Descriptions 58 

Graduate Faculty and Administration 76 

Index 77 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER 2005 
(15-Week Term) 



AUGUST 



4-5 


Thur-Fri 


8-12 


Mon-Wed 


11-12 


Thur-Fri 


15 


Monday 


15-16 


Mon-Tues 



Fall Faculty Institute 

Freshman Orientation 

Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

First day of classes 

Late registration and Drop/Add (Late Fee Charged) 



SEPTEMBER 



Monday 



HOLIDAY-Labor Day 



OCTOBER 



Wednesday Mid Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course 

without academic penalty 
Mon-Fri Early registration for Spring 2006 

Saturday HOMECOMING 



24-28 
29 



NOVEMBER 



23 Wednesday HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students) 

24-25 Thur-Fri HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students, Faculty, Staff) 



DECEMBER 



2 Friday Last day of classes 

3-9 Fri-Thur Final Exams 

6 Tuesday Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstatement 

of Financial Aid for Spring 2006 
10 Saturday COMMENCEMENT 

12 Monday Final grades due in Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



SPRING SEMESTER 2006 
(15-Week Term) 



JANUARY 



3-4 Tues-Wed Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

5 Thursday First day of classes 

5-6 Thur-Fri Late registration and Drop/Add (Late Fee Charged) 

16 Monday HOLIDAY-Martin Luther King, Jr. 



FEBRUARY 



N/A 



MARCH 



1 


Wednesday 


13-18 


Mon-Sat 


27-31 


Mon-Fri 



Mid Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 

SPRING BREAK 

Early registration for Fall and Summer 2006 



APRIL 

14 
28 
29 



Friday HOLIDAY-Good Friday 

Friday Last day of classes 

Saturday Final Exams 



MAY 



1-5 Mon-Fri Final Exams 

5 Friday Final grades due in the Registrar's office 9:00 a.m. 

(Graduating Seniors) 

6 Saturday COMMENCEMENT 

8 Monday Final grades due in the Registrar's office 9:00 a.m. 

29 Monday HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 

(8-Week Term) 

SESSION I 



MAY 



15-16 Mon-Tues Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. — 7:00 p.m. 

16 Tuesday First day of classes late registration (Late Fee 

Charged) Drop/Add 
29 Monday HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



JUNE 



15 Thursday Mid-Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course 

without academic penalty 



JULY 



4 


Tuesday 


6 


Thursday 


10-11 


Mon-Tues 


13 


Thursday 


14 


Friday 



HOLIDAY-Independence Day 

Last day of classes 

Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's Office-9:00 a.m. 

Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstatement of 

Financial Aid- Fall 2006 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 

(5-Week Term) 

SESSION II 



MAY 



15-16 Mon-Tues Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

16 Tuesday First day of classes late registration (Late Fee 

Charged) Drop/Add 
29 Monday HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



JUNE 



5 Monday Mid-Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 
22-23 Thur-Fri Final Exams 

26 Monday Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 

(5-Week Term) 

SESSION III 



JUNE 


26 

27 
28 


Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 


Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

First day of classes 

Late registration-Drop/Add 


JULY 


4 
14 


Tuesday 
Friday 


HOLIDAY- Independence Day 

Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstatement 

of Financial Aid-Fall 2005 


AUGUST 



1 Tuesday Last day of classes 

2-3 Wed-Thur Final Exams 

4 Friday Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



FALL SEMESTER 2006 
(15-Week Term) 



AUGUST 



7 Monday Fall Faculty Institute 

9-12 Wed-Sat Freshman Orientation 

14-15 Mon-Tues Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. — 7:00 p.m. 

16 Wednesday First day of classes 

16-18 Wed-Fri Late registration and Drop/Add (Late Fee Charged) 



SEPTEMBER 



Monday 



HOLIDAY-Labor Day 



OCTOBER 



6 



28 



Friday Mid Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course 

without academic penalty. 

Early registration for Spring 2006 
Saturday HOMECOMING 



NOVEMBER 



22 Wednesday 

23-24 Thur-Fri 



HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students) 
HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students, Faculty, Staff) 



DECEMBER 



4 Monday Last day of classes 

5-11 Tues-Mon Final Exams. Deadline for submitting Appeal for 

Reinstatement of Financial Aid-Spring 2007 
9 Saturday COMMENCEMENT 

14 Thursday Final grades due in Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



SPRING SEMESTER 2007 
(15-Week Term) 



JANUARY 



4-5 


Thur-Fri 


8 


Monday 


9-10 


Tues-Wed 


15 


Monday 



Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 
First day of classes 

Late registration and Drop/Add (Late Fee Charged) 
HOLIDAY-Martin Luther King, Jr. 



FEBRUARY 



N/A 



MARCH 



Thursday Mid Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 
Mon-Fri SPRING BREAK 

Mon-Fri Early registration for Fall and Summer 2007 



12-16 
19-23 



APRIL 



6 



Friday 



HOLIDAY-Good Friday 



MAY 



I Tuesday Last day of classes 
2-8 Wed-Tues Final Exams 

II Friday Final grades due in the Registrar's office 9:00 a.m. 

(Graduating Seniors) 

11 Friday Final grades due in the Registrar's office 9:00 a.m. 

12 Saturday COMMENCEMENT 

28 Monday ' HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(8-Week Term) 

SESSION I 



MAY 



JUNE 



7:00 p.m. 



14-15 Mon-Tues Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. 

15 Tuesday First day of classes Late registration 

(Late Fee Charged) Drop/Add 
28 Monday HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



Mid-Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 
academic penalty 



JULY 



Wednesday HOLIDAY-Independence Day 

Last day of classes 
Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's Office-9:00 a.m. 
Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstatement of 
Financial Aid-Fall 2006 



10 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(5-Week Term) 

SESSION II 



MAY 



14-15 Mon-Tues Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

15 Tuesday First day of classes/late registration (Late Fee 

Charged) Drop/Add 
28 Monday HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



JUNE 



Monday Mid-Term-Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 
Thur-Fri Final Exams 

Monday Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



21-22 
25 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(5-Week Term) 

SESSION III 



JUNE 



25 Monday Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

26 Tuesday First day of classes 

27 Wednesday Late registration Drop/Add 



JULY 



4 Wednesday HOLIDAY-Independence Day 

Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstatement of 

Financial Aid-Fall 2006 
31 Tuesday Last day of classes 



AUGUST 



1-2 Wed-Thur Final Exams 

3 Friday Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



11 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

Savannah State University has proudly served the edu- 
cational, cultural, and community development needs of 
Coastal Georgia for 115 years. For much of this historical 
period, it was the only state-supported institution of higher 
education in the region, and it has met the challenges of 
being a beacon for learning for all. Now, at the dawn of the 
twenty-first century, Savannah State University continues 
to move forward with strength, vision, and focus. 

Graduate education at Savannah State University plays a 
significant role in our institutional efforts to carry out our 
mission of teaching, research and service. By seeking and 
securing regional and national professional accreditations, 
hiring outstanding faculty, and focusing on continuing qual- 
ity improvement processes, we have sought to position our 
graduates to compete in the region and in the world. 



• 1 . 


• 


* IF 




mil 



Our faculty and staff are committed to developing the intellect of our students through 
professional relationships in the classroom, in the laboratory, and in the community. Our 
graduates are fully prepared to move boldly into the world, living out the dreams and 
hopes of the Founders. Come. Join us. Your life will be forever changed. 



Sincerely, 
Carlton E. Brown 



12 



FROM THE GRADUATE DEAN... 

Welcome to Graduate Studies at Savannah State University. You have joined a commu- 
nity of faculty, staff, and students that will become your colleagues, friends and mentors. 
You chose well. 

Savannah State University is located in a coastal, urban port city setting, and serves resi- 
dential and commuter students from diverse educational, geographical, and racial back- 
grounds. In a beautiful and unique setting of a live oak forest next to a salt marsh estuary, 
the University is well situated for the study of marine resources, environmental, urban 
and coastal issues. 

Our graduate programs have earned regional and national accreditations. Members of the 
faculty are committed scholars, researchers, and nationally recognized teachers who have 
developed strong programs. You will feel the commitment and excitement that they have 
for what they do. 

In graduate school you have the opportunity to make an original and lasting contribution 
to your profession. SSU graduate students have published their works in international 
journals, and presented at national and international meetings. Together, with the fac- 
ulty, you, too, can create an academic legacy that will honor you for years and provide 
evidence of the University's motto, 'You can get anywhere from here." 

If you have questions or comments, contact me at williamg@savstate.edu or call (912) 
356-2244. I look forward to the day when you receive a diploma and we shake hands in 
front of the crowd attending the ceremony honoring your graduation from Savannah State 
University. 

Sincerely, 

George N. Williams, Dean 




13 



HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

Savannah State University was founded when enabling legislation was passed by the 
Georgia General Assembly on November 26, 1890, creating a normal school for the train- 
ing of Black citizens. The fledgling institution, known as the Georgia State Industrial 
College (GSIC) for Colored Youths, began its first session in June 1891, in the Baxter 
Street School Building in Athens, Georgia with Dr. Richard R. Wright, Sr., as principal, 
and was considered a part of the University of Georgia. 

Religious and educational leaders such as Professor John Mcintosh, Reverend E. K. Love, 
James Simms, Alexander Harris, and others met in March 1891, in the basement of the 
First African Baptist Church and developed a proposal that convinced Judge Peter W. 
Meldrin, chair, and the other white members of the Georgia State Industrial College Board 
of Commissioners to relocate the new Black institution in Savannah. 

The College was established as a result of the Second Morrill Land Grant Act of August 
30, 1890, which had specific wording mandating the development of Black land grant col- 
leges in the southern and border states. The early educational paradigm of the College was 
based on the Talented Tenth philosophy of Dr. W.E. B. DuBois, the Hampton/Tuskegee 
Institute vocational model espoused by Dr. Booker T. Washington, and the model of the 
New England College as experienced by Dr. Richard R. Wright, Sr., in his education under 
the American Missionary Association at Atlanta University. The early curriculum had 
normal, agricultural, vocational, and college programs. The College opened in Savannah 
on October 7, 1891, with Richard R. Wright, Sr., as principal, five students from Ware 
High School in Augusta, and a foreman for the farm. Richard R. Wright, Jr., received the 
first baccalaureate degree from the College in June 1898. During Wright's presidency, 
U. S. Presidents William McKinley (December 1898) and William Howard Taft (May 1, 
1912) visited the campus. During Cyrus G. Wiley's (GSIC Class of 1899) tenure (1921-26), 
women were admitted as boarding students, and the College was established as a federal 
agricultural extension center. 

Under President Benjamin F. Hubert (1926-1947), the entire academic program was re- 
organized. The high school and normal departments were discontinued and the school be- 
came a four-year college. In 1931, when the University System was placed under a Board 
of Regents, the College began to offer additional bachelor's degree programs with majors 
in English, the natural sciences, social sciences, and business administration, as well as in 
agriculture and home economics. 

President James A. Colston (1947-1949) modernized the campus of Georgia State College. 
He built the first student center, established the first office of public relations, initiated 
the Campus Chest Program, and installed a campus-wide telephone system. In 1949, 
the College's land-grant status was transferred to Fort Valley State College. It was dur- 
ing Colston's administration that Savannah State became accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). After President Colston resigned in 1949, 
William Kenneth Payne, who was serving as dean of the College, became acting president. 
By 1950, Payne was named president. In September 1950, the Institution's name was 
changed to Savannah State College. The first major building program of the modern era 
began during President Payne's tenure when Richard R. Wright Hall, Colston Hall, Wiley 
Gymnasium, and B. F. Hubert Technical Sciences Center were constructed. Payne died 
during his term of office in August 1963, and was succeeded by Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., in 
September 1963. 

President Jordan spearheaded a major building program at the College, which resulted 
in the construction of a modern student union, new football stadium, fine arts building, 



14 



Payne Hall, and new dormitories for men and women. White students were admitted to 
the College after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed, and the first white faculty mem- 
bers were hired during this time. In 1968, Savannah State College founded Savannah's 
first graduate program in education. The program soon received NCATE accreditation. Dr. 
Jordan resigned from the College in 1971 to become the first Black vice chancellor for the 
central office of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

In 1971, Dr. Prince A. Jackson, Jr., became the second Savannah State College graduate 
to become president of the Institution. His administration was responsible for the develop- 
ment of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Program, the establishment of WHCJ-FM 
Radio Station, and construction of new buildings. Dr. Jackson was succeeded by Dr. Clyde 
W. Hall (1978-80), a Savannah State graduate and professor of technical sciences. As act- 
ing president, Dr. Hall developed plans for a new administration building and health cen- 
ter, and initiated improvements to the infrastructure of the College. 

Dr. Wendell G. Rayburn (1980-1988), eighth president of Savannah State College, led 
the institution through its first major building program since the 1970s. His adminis- 
tration worked through the Desegregation Plan of the Board of Regents and completed 
the building of the marine biology facilities, Jordan College of Business Administration, 
the president's house (later named William E. Gardner Hall), and Harris-McDew Health 
Services Center. In 1988, Dr. Rayburn resigned to become president of Lincoln University 
in Jefferson City, Missouri. He was succeeded by Dr. Wiley S. Bolden who served as acting 
president from 1988-1989. Dr. Bolden was instrumental in leading the College to continue 
its existence as a historically Black institution. 

Dr. William E. Gardner, Jr., (1989-1991) was selected as the ninth president of the College 
in September 1989, and presided over a period of enrollment growth for the Institution. 
He successfully led the College to achieve SACS reaffirmation of its accreditation for a 
ten-year-period (1990-2000). Dr. Gardner was responsible for the replica of the Navy jet 
flown by Commander Donnie L. Cochran, U.S. Navy "Blue Angels" demonstration flying 
team, being placed in front of the McGlockton NROTC Building. He also spearheaded 
the Centennial Celebration of Savannah State and the restoration of Adams Hall as the 
College's archives building and established the Advanced Water Technology Center. Dr. 
Gardener died suddenly in office in 1991, and was succeeded by Dr. Annette K. Brock, 
a Savannah State College graduate, and professor and chair, Department of Social and 
Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Brock served as acting president from 1991 until 1993. As the 
College's first woman president, she continued the successful work of the previous admin- 
istration and was instrumental in locating the Olympic track at Theodore Wright Stadium 
and institutionalizing the College's archives with the support of Title III funding. 

Dr. John T. Wolfe, Jr. (1993-1997) became the tenth president of Savannah State College. 
During his tenure, the campus-wide network was completed, Banner was installed on 
the network, and computers were placed on the desks of all faculty and staff. In addition, 
graduate programs in Public Administration and Social Work were returned to the insti- 
tution, several classroom buildings were renovated, and the plans for Tiger Arena were 
approved. During his administration, the Board of Regents of the University System of 
Georgia elevated Savannah State College, along with twelve other regional state colleges, 
to the status of state universities (1996). 

Dr. Carlton E. Brown became the eleventh president of Savannah State University on 
July 1, 1997. Over the past eight years, Dr. Brown has led the efforts to foster a new era of 
greatness for this historic institution, including the first public/private partnership to con- 
struct new student housing, improved athletics program, construction of a new living and 
learning center for freshmen students, reaffirmation of SACS accreditation, accreditation 
of the College of Business, and professional accreditation of the Master's degree programs 
in Public Administration and Social Work. 



15 



LOCATION 

Savannah State University is located approximately five miles east of the downtown of 
beautiful, historic Savannah, the original European settlement in Southeast Georgia, 
founded by James Oglethorpe in 1733. Savannah today is an extraordinarily attractive 
and busy port city with nearly 200,000 inhabitants. Close by are the historic and contem- 
porary sea islands of Georgia and South Carolina, such as St. Simons, Jekyll, Hilton Head, 
and Daufuskie Islands. It is rooted in the Low Country — and the famed Gullah-Geechee 
culture, a blend of early African and American ways of life, language, cuisine, and music. 
Tybee Island lies to the east and is noted for its easy-going life style and sport fishing. The 
general environment is replete with abundant historic and contemporary tourist and out- 
door attractions, including wildlife refuges, museums, heritage preserves, and numerous 
other attractions. Historically, the region was noted for its rich rice and cotton production 
as well as its lively pirate trade. Many believe Savannah, with its exemplary urban re- 
newal and historic preservation record, is the ultimate Southern hostess city. 

The campus itself lies on a stunningly beautiful site adjacent to the inland waterway near 
the estuary of the Savannah River and proximate to the Atlantic coast. Several of the 
University's major buildings overlook the open marsh and peaceful tidewater flood plain 
while others center on the two beautifully landscaped quads of native foliage. A temperate 
climate encourages year-round outdoor activities with mean high temperatures ranging 
from the low 50s for December/January to the 80s for July/August. 

Savannah State University is accessed from north/south Interstate 95 and east/west 
Interstate 16. A beautiful, modern and convenient Savannah International Airport makes 
the region accessible from anywhere in the world. Nearby cities include Atlanta and 
Macon, Georgia; Jacksonville and St. Augustine, Florida; Charleston and Columbia, South 
Carolina, and Charlotte, North Carolina. 



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16 



CAMPUS 

The campus, comprising 165 acres, presents a unique setting of natural beauty. Among its 
buildings are two that were constructed during the administration of the University's first 
president, Major Richard R. Wright: Hill Hall (1901) and Hammond Hall (1915), both of 
which are located on Alexis Circle. 

Administrative functions, including the offices of the President, Academic Affairs, 
Business and Finance, Enrollment Management, Human Resources, the Registrar, and 
Student Accounts are housed in the Colston Administration Building, located just inside 
the Falligant Avenue gate. 

Administrative offices for the dean of the College of Business and Administration (COBA) 
are located in Howard Jordan Hall, across from Tiger Arena. The dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Social Sciences has offices in John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Building (1967). 
And, the dean of the College of Sciences and Technology has offices in Hubert Technical 
Sciences Building (1960). 

The Asa Gordon Library (1976) is a circular- shaped building located on the southern por- 
tion of the campus, near the Howard Jordan Hall and Helen Adele Whiting Hall. 

The Martin Luther King, Jr- Varnetta Frazier Student Center on the Felix J. Alexis Circle, 
houses the Dining Hall and Snack Bar, and all student affairs units, including the offices 
of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Career Services, Auxiliary Services, Disability 
Services, Student Counseling, Residential Life, Student Housing, and Student Activities. 
The facility also houses the President's private dining room, the bookstore, the campus 
post office, a ballroom with a capacity of 538, the Norman Elmore theater, with a seat- 
ing capacity of 320, and game room facilities. The building also provides office space for 
Continuing Education and International Educational Programs. 

Classroom buildings include: 

Drew-Griffith Center for the Natural Sciences provides offices, laboratories, and classroom 
space for natural sciences, including biology, environmental studies, physics, and chem- 
istry. 

Howard Jordan Hall, across from Tiger Arena, houses faculty offices and classrooms for 
the College of Business. The Mary Torian Auditorium is located in this facility. 

Hubert Technical Sciences Center, near Adams Hall, provides office space, computer labs, 
science labs, and classroom space for many of the classes in sciences and engineering tech- 
nology. 

Kennedy Fine Arts Building, across from the Medgar Evers Physical Plant, provides office 
space and classroom space for programs in music, band, theater, and fine arts. 

The Marine Science Building, on the marsh near the Alexis Circle, provides offices and 
classrooms and wet labs for marine sciences undergraduate and graduate courses. 

W. K. Payne Hall, is a two-story building that provides office space, computer labs, lan- 
guage laboratory, and classroom space for most of the classes in African Studies, criminal 
justice, English, history, humanities, modern languages, political science, religion and 
philosophical studies, psychology, public administration, social work, sociology, and urban 
studies. Payne Hall is located on Thompson Road, near Alexis Circle. 



17 



MISSION AND GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

MISSION STATEMENT 

Chartered by the State of Georgia in 1890, as a department of the State University for the 
education and training of Negro students, Savannah State University is now one of the 
most diverse institutions in the University System of Georgia. While remaining true to its 
historical mission of service to the African American community, Savannah State has em- 
braced students with varied ages, backgrounds, ethnicity, religion, and national origins. 

The University's mission is to graduate students prepared to perform at higher levels of 
economic productivity, social responsibility, and excellence in their chosen fields of en- 
deavor in a changing global community. This educational goal is realized through pro- 
gram offerings in the College of Business Administration, the College of Liberal Arts and 
Social Sciences, and the College of Sciences and Technology, which lead to baccalaureate, 
and master's degrees. The University's mission is consistent with the core missions of the 
University System of Georgia and the senior universities in the System. 

Savannah State University shares with the University System of Georgia the following 
characteristics: 

• A supportive campus climate, necessary services, and leadership development 
opportunities, all to educate the whole person and meet the needs of students, 
faculty, and staff; cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in faculty, staff, 
and student body, supported by practices and programs that embody the ideals 
of an open, democratic, and global society; 

• Technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, 
student support services, and distance education; collaborative relationships 
with other System institutions, state agencies, local schools and technical insti- 
tutes, and businesses and industries, sharing physical, human, information and 
other resources to expand and enhance programs and services available to the 
citizens of Georgia. 

Savannah State University shares with senior universities in the University System of 
Georgia these characteristics: 

• A commitment to excellence and responsiveness within the scope of influence 
defined by the needs of an area of the state, and by particularly outstanding 
programs or distinctive characteristics that have a magnet effect throughout the 
region or state; 

• A commitment to the teaching/learning environment, both inside and outside 
the classroom, that sustains instructional excellence, serves a diverse and col- 
lege prepared student body, promotes high levels of student achievement, offers 
academic assistance, and provides Student Academic Support programs for a 
limited student cohort; 

• A commitment to a high quality general education program supporting a variety 
of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional programming at the baccalau- 
reate level, with selected master's, and selected associate degree programs based 
on area need and/or inter-institutional collaborations; 



18 



• A commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, and 
economic development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of 
life, and raise the educational level within the University's scope of influence; 
and 

• A commitment to scholarly and creative work to enhance instructional effective- 
ness and to encourage faculty scholarly pursuits; and a commitment to applied 
research in selected areas of institutional strength and area need. 

The continuing commitment of Savannah State University to academic excellence is ex- 
pressed through the following characteristics: 

• Tradition of serving the educational needs of African-American students as well 
as those of all other students, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture; the his- 
torical tradition as an African-American institution which defines the Univer- 
sity as a unique cultural and educational resource for the interpretation and 
transmission of the African-American legacy; the guiding principle of the faculty 
and staff which is service to students expressed by quality, student-centered 
instruction, scholarship, research and effective support services that nurture the 
intellect and value honesty and human sensitivity; a high quality general educa- 
tion offered through the core curriculum in humanities, mathematics, natural 
sciences, and social and behavioral sciences; 

• Baccalaureate degree offerings with a dynamic mix of liberal arts programs that 
address the study of the humanities, social sciences and the sciences; profes- 
sional programs that address the study of commerce, entrepreneurship, commu- 
nications, social services, technology and environmental sustainability; master's 
degree offerings that address the study of the social and behavioral sciences, and 
natural sciences; and initiatives to provide new programs and levels of service to 
meet the ever changing needs of a coastal urban area; 

• A commitment to excellence in the area of engineering technology; 

• Student Academic Support services that provide educational access and oppor- 
tunity for students, and service programs, offered singularly and collaboratively, 
to enhance student satisfaction and academic success; and an active community 
service function that is carried out through collaborative partnerships with busi- 
ness, private and government agencies, public schools, and other institutions in 
the University System. 



19 



ACCREDITATIONS 

Savannah State University is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 
30033-4097, phone 404.679.4501) to award baccalaureate and master's degrees. 

Specific degree programs and their accreditations follow. 

• The Bachelor of Business Administration degree program is accredited by the 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. 

• The Bachelor of Science degree program in Civil Engineering Technology is ac- 
credited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology. 

• The Bachelor of Science degree program in Electronics Engineering Technology 
is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology and by the National Association of Radio 
and Telecommunications Engineers, Inc. 

• The Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology is accred- 
ited by the Technology Accreditation and governmental agencies, public schools, 
and other institutions in the University System. 

• Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. 

• The Bachelor of Social Work degree program is accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education Commission on Accreditation. 

• The Master of Public Administration degree program is accredited by the Na- 
tional Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. 

• The Master of Social Work degree program is accredited by the Council on Social 
Work Education Commission on Accreditation. 




20 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

President Carlton E. Brown 

B.A., M.A., Ed.D. University of Massachusetts 

Vice President for Academic Affairs Joseph H. Silver Sr. 

B.S., St. Augustine College; 
M.A., Ph.D. Atlanta University 

Vice President for Business and Finance Arthur L. Moncrief 

B.S., Alabama State University; 
M.B.A., Troy State University 

Vice President for Student Affairs Randy S. Gunter 

B.A, Central College of Iowa; 

M.S.W., University of Georgia; 

Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Larion Williams 

B.B.A., Savannah State University 

Executive Assistant to the President J. Allen Zow 

B.A., Bethune-Cookman; 
J.D., University of Florida 

Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Beverly Watkins 

B.A., California State University; 

M.S.W., Wayne State University; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Dean, Enrollment Management Judith W. Edwin 

B.A., Michigan State University; 

M.Ed., University of Miami; 

Ed.D., University of San Diego 

Director of Administrative Affairs Cynthia M. Buskey 

B.S., South Carolina State University; 
M.P.A., Savannah State University 



21 



COLLEGES 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Jordan Hall, (912) 356-2335 

Dean Mostafa H. Sarhan 

B.S., University of Cairo; 

M.B.A., Texas A&M University; 

Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

Associate Dean Lydia McKinley- Floyd 

B.A., M.B.A, University of llinois; 
Ph.D., Emory University 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Kennedy Building, (912) 356-2208/2209 

Dean Jane M. Gates 

B.A., Arkansas State University; 

M.P.A, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; 

Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Chair, (Interim) Department of Liberal Arts Dr. Rose Metts 

B.S., Morgan State University; 

M.S., Kansas State University; 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Chair, Department of Social Work Bernita C. Berry 

B.A., Morris Brown College; 

M.S.W., Atlanta University; 

Ph.D., Kent State University 

Chair, Department of Political Science, 

Public Administration, and Urban Studies Shirley M. Geiger 

B.A., Howard University; 
M.P.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Chair, Department of Mass Communications Charles J. Elmore 

B.S., Savannah State College; 
M.A.; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Larry D . Stokes 

B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 

Ph.D. Howard University 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 
Hubert D, (912) 356-2349 

Dean Babajide Familoni 

B.Sc, University of Lagos 
Ph.D., University of Alberta; 

Chair, Department of Natural Sciences & Mathematics Harpal Singh 

B.S., M.S., Punjab University; 
M.P.H, Ph.D., University of Tennessee 



22 



OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND SPONSORED RESEARCH 

Hubert B, (912) 356-2244 

Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research George N. Williams 

B.S., Savannah State College; 

M.S., Tuskegee Institute; 

Ph.D., Howard University 

Graduate Admissions Coordinator/Recruiter Dara Crawford 

B.A., Savannah State University 
M.T., Georgia Southern University 

Director of Survey Research Center Malik Watkins 

B.A., DeVry Institute; 

M.B.A., University of Notre Dame; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Assistant Director of Survey Research Center Althea Adams-Sutton 

B.A., Savannah State University 
M.P.A., Savannah State University 



GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

Marine Sciences, MSMS Dr. Matthew Gilligan 

Marine Science 103 

912-356-2808 

gillganm@savstate . edu 

Public Administration, MPA Faculty Committee 

Powell Hall 110 
912-356-2966 

Social Work, MSW Dr. Shinaz Jindani 

Powell Hall 105 

912-356-2321 

jindanis@savstate.edu 

Urban Studies, MSUS Faculty Committee 

Powell Hall 110 
912-356-2966 



23 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Savannah State University is a community that values and appreciates diversity. The 
Office of Student Affairs strives to provide a wide range of student support services and 
programs consistent with individual student needs and Savannah State's commitment to 
diversity. 

The mission of the Office of Student Affairs at Savannah State University is to encourage 
and enhance the intellectual and personal growth and development of students. Student 
Affairs includes athletics and intramural sports, campus ministry, career services, hous- 
ing, international student services, orientation, student activities, student discipline and 
judicial procedures, student organizations and volunteerism. 

Savannah State University is committed to meeting the social, psychological, spiritual, 
and physical needs of its students through integrated and diverse programs and services 
that will both challenge and support the development of life skills. The resources of the 
Office of Student Affairs are utilized to facilitate the learning process of students both 
inside and outside of the classroom and to achieve the University's goal of developing the 
whole person. 

Through the programs and services of the Office of Student Affairs, service to others, ap- 
preciation of diversity, and a global perspective are strongly and actively encouraged. 
Student Affairs is located in the King Frazier Complex and can be contacted at (912) 356- 
2194. 

OFFICE OF COUNSELING AND DISABILITIES SERVICES 

Professional counseling addresses students' needs related to social and emotional issues 
that may be affecting their day-to-day functioning, grades, and stable school life. Disability 
Services is committed to providing an equal education opportunity for all qualified students 
with disabilities, which are physical or mental. Accommodations are academic adaptations 
that do not compromise academic standards or the mastery of essential course elements, 
but provide students with disabilities an equal opportunity to succeed. Academic accom- 
modations, auxiliary aids and support services are individualized and based on disability 
documentation, functional limitations, and an assessment of needs. It is the student's 
responsibility to contact the Counseling and Disability Office to seek accommodation and 
discuss their needs. The Office of Counseling and Disabilities Services is located in the 
King Frazier Complex, Room 228, and can be contacted at (912) 356-2202. 




24 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

RIGHT TO CHANGE POLICIES 

This catalog is neither a contract nor an offer of a contract. Policies and procedures stat- 
ed in this catalog require continuing evaluation, review, and approval by appropriate 
University officials. All statements reflect policies or procedures in existence at the time 
this catalog went to press, and the University reserves the right to change policies at any 
time and without prior notice. Not all courses are offered each academic year, and faculty 
assignments may change. 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 

Savannah State University (SSU) is committed to the policy of providing equal opportunity 
for all persons and will not discriminate in admissions, programs, or any other educational 
function or service on the basis of sex, disability, age, race, national origin, color, or reli- 
gion. In carrying out this commitment, the University follows the principle of affirmative 
action and operates within the federal laws and executive orders prohibiting discrimina- 
tion. Inquiries concerning the application of any of the federal laws or regulations may be 
referred to Savannah State University Office of Human Resources at (912) 356-2180. 

JEANNE CLERY DISCLOSURE OF CAMPUS SECURITY POLICY AND 
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS ACT OF 1998 

The Department of Public Safety is primarily responsible for the safety of members and 
guests of the university community by providing law enforcement services throughout the 
campus 24 hours per day, seven days per week throughout the calendar year. Staffed by 
State of Georgia certified officers with specialized training, officers of the Department of 
Public Safety have arrest powers for offenses committed on any public or private property 
within 500 yards of any property under the auspices of the University System of Georgia. 
Students are entitled to request and receive a copy of the Security Report for the campus, 
which includes statistics for the past three years concerning crimes and incidents reported 
to campus security authorities. This report also provides campus policies and practices 
concerning security; how to report sexual assault and other crimes, crime prevention ef- 
forts, policies/laws governing alcohol and drugs, victims' assistance programs, student 
discipline, campus resources, and other matters. In emergency situations, students are 
instructed to contact the Department of Public Safety located in Harris Hall and available 
by telephone at (912) 356-2186. 

FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA) 

Students at Savannah State University have certain rights with regard to their educa- 
tional records as stipulated by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA- 
Buckley Amendment). FERPA is designed to protect the students' rights with regard to 
education records maintained by the institution. Under FERPA, students may inspect 
and review their own education records maintained by the institution and challenge the 
content of records (except grades which can only be challenged through the academic ap- 
peal procedure) on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading or in violation of 
privacy or other rights. Students may control disclosures from educational records with 
certain exceptions. Teachers, administrators and the like within the same institution 
may look at a student's record if they have a "legitimate educational interest." A copy of 
a summary of the FERPA regulations may be obtained in the Office of the Department of 
Education, Washington, D.C. 20201. 



25 



EQUAL ACCESS POLICY 

Savannah State University makes every effort to meet special accommodation and ac- 
cess needs. For information on specific accommodations for individuals with disabilities, 
contact the organization sponsoring the class or event you wish to attend or call the Office 
of Counseling and Disabilities Services at (912) 356-2202, located in the King-Frazier 
Student Center Complex, Room 228. 

POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT 

Sexual harassment is considered to be a form of discrimination based on sex and falls with- 
in the statutory prohibitions against sex discrimination. The University is committed to 
maintaining a working and a study environment free of sexual harassment. Accordingly, 
in compliance with Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of 
the Education Amendments of 1972, it is the university's policy not to tolerate any verbal, 
nonverbal, or physical behavior which constitutes sexual harassment. Personnel with 
supervisory responsibilities are required to take immediate and appropriate action when 
incidents of alleged sexual harassment are brought to their attention. Violations of the 
policy prohibiting sexual harassment may lead to disciplinary actions, including repri- 
mand, suspension, or termination of employment or academic status. 

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, 
and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: 1. submission to 
such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's 
employment or academic decisions; or 2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an 
individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions; or 3. such conduct 
has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or aca- 
demic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or academic 
environment. 

Faculty, staff, students, and applicants for employment or admission with complaints of 
sexual harassment should contact the University EEO/AA Office, located in the Colston 
Administration Building at (912) 351-3812, on a confidential basis and request an informal 
investigation. 

Faculty, staff, and students may file formal complaints outside of the university. Students 
may file formal complaints with the Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education. 
Faculty may file formal complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 
Staff may contact the state EEO Office or the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission. 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Savannah State University is an academic community dedicated to teaching, learning, 
and research. Like other communities, the University can function properly only if its 
members share a expectation of intellectual honesty. Academic integrity promotes the de- 
velopment and expression of new ideas, while academic dishonesty acts as a corrosive force 
in the life of the university. Academic integrity enhances the quality of each student's 
education and allows for the recognition of the genuine achievements and accomplish- 
ments of all. 

By enrolling at Savannah State University, students acknowledge their obligation to ad- 
here to the Code of Academic Integrity. As members of the University community, stu- 
dents are responsible for promoting academic integrity. This includes the responsibilities 
to report cases of academic dishonesty and to cooperate with faculty in resolving such 
cases. 



26 



GRADUATE STUDIES 

The Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research (GSSR) directs Graduate Studies 
at Savannah State University and shares responsibility for program development, man- 
agement, promotion, and review with the individual graduate program's colleges, and 
the Graduate Council. Students are always welcome to visit the graduate offices located 
in Hubert B, room 400A, or telephone at (912) 356-2244. Graduate School admissions 
staff process applications, handle enrollment questions, and maintain student records. 
Graduate staff also manages the graduate assistantship program, produce academic and 
promotional materials, assist with recruiting and marketing efforts, and provide logistical 
support for the Graduate Council. 

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) is co-located with the Office of 
Graduate Studies in Hubert B. Under the direction of the Dean, GSSR, the ORSP pro- 
vides leadership, coordination, and services for faculty and staff members seeking external 
funds that contribute to strengthening all forms of scholarship at SSU. As the single point 
of contact for all activities between the University and its external sponsors, ORSP admin- 
isters grant proposals, and disseminates information on research and program trends and 
sources of support from sponsoring agencies. 

MISSION 

The mission of the Office of Graduate Studies is to provide leadership for developing and 
sustaining quality graduate programs; to promote graduate education; to facilitate stu- 
dent access to graduate programs; to support and promote public service, research, and 
sponsored programs; and to support faculty development. In keeping with the SSU mis- 
sion, the Office of Graduate Studies strives to carry out its mission in an environment that 
enhances the ability of students to perform at higher levels of excellence in their chosen 
fields of endeavors and to prepare leaders and responsible citizens in a changing global 
community. 

ADMISSIONS 

Admissions to graduate certificate and master's programs in the SSU Office of Graduate 
Studies, requires a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution with sub- 
stantially the same undergraduate program as Savannah State University. Most pro- 
grams require a 3.0 GPA on the last 60 hours or a 2.7 GPA on all undergraduate hours. 
Official transcripts, which are sent directly from the college or university that issued the 
degree, are required. 

Students must satisfy requirements of the program which they seek admission as well 
as of the Office of Graduate Studies. The section of this Catalog on each degree program 
includes admission requirements of each specific program. 

Some degrees require the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test 
(MAT), or Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Scores must be within the 
last five years to be accepted. Test scores alone do not determine admission to a program, 
but are one piece of data. Letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, and personal 
interviews are also used to assess a student's preparedness for and probability of success 
in a program. 

Applicants who do not meet all minimum admission criteria may, in rare instances, be 
admitted provisionally. 



27 



GRADUATE ACADEMIC RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT 

Academic residence is defined as being enrolled in one or more courses at Savannah State 
University. This is not to be confused with status as a legal resident of the State of Georgia 
for fee determination purposes. The minimum academic residence requirement for each 
master degree program is as follows: 

• The candidate must earn 27 semester hours at Savannah State University in 
the MPA and MSUS with an average of at least a B (3.00 GPA); 

• At least 30 semester hours at Savannah State University in the MSW program 
with an average of B (3.00 GPA). 

• The candidate must earn 28 semester hours at Savannah State University in 
the MSMS program with an average of at least B (3.00 GPA). 

No student will receive a master's degree from Savannah State University who does not 
meet the minimum academic residence requirement. All work credited toward the gradu- 
ate degree must be completed within five years. Extension of time, not to exceed the time 
limit included in the policy of the University may be granted only on conditions beyond the 
control of the student. A formal request outlining the conditions upon which the extension 
of time is made should be addressed to the program coordinator of your respective program 
(e.g., MSMS, MPA, MSW, or MSUS), the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social 
Sciences, or of the College of Science and Technology, and the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

IMMUNIZATION 

Only graduate students who intend to reside on campus must submit a completed 
University System of Georgia Certificate of Immunization as a condition of admission. 
Applicants must provide proof of immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella if born on 
or after January 1, 1957. Forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies and must 
be returned with proof of immunization. 

PERSONS SIXTY-TWO YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 

Persons who are sixty-two years of age or older may enroll in credit courses on a "space 
available" basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, laboratory, or special course 
fees. They must be residents of the state of Georgia and must present a birth certificate 
or comparable written documentation of age to enable the Office of Graduate Studies to 
determine eligibility. They must meet all admission and degree requirements. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

After being accepted at Savannah State University and upon receipt of certification of 
eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans Administration, veterans may attend under 
Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 (disabled), 
Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public Law 631 (children of 
permanently disabled veterans). Students under Public Laws 358,631,634 should be pre- 
pared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION APPLICANTS 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other community agencies 
must apply at least six weeks before the beginning of any semester to ensure proper pro- 
cessing of application. 



28 



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29 



THE APPLICATION PROCESS 

Students may request an application by telephone, email, or letter from the Graduate 
Dean or the program office. After completing the application packet, the student should 
request two copies of transcripts from all undergraduate or graduate institutions attended 
be sent to the address below: 

Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research 

Savannah State University 

P.O. Box 20243 

Savannah, Georgia 31404 USA 

APPLICATION FEE 

The application-processing fee is collected to help offset the cost of processing application 
materials; it is non-refundable and cannot be deferred or credited toward tuition. The fee 
is $25.00 for all applicants. Please refer to the program of study to determine if additional 
items are needed to complete the application packet. It is the applicant's responsibility to 
ensure that all admission documents are received in the Office of Graduate Studies in a 
timely manner. All credentials submitted by or behalf of an applicant become the property 
of Savannah State University and may be maintained for up to one year. Materials from 
applicants who do not submit all requested material will be shredded and discarded. Once 
an application has been submitted, applicants should notify the Office of Graduate Studies 
of any change in plans regarding enrollment. Withholding information or submitting inac- 
curate information may make applicants ineligible for admission and subject to dismissal 
from the Graduate Program. 

APPLICATION DEADLINES 

Deadlines for admission applications vary from program to program and are subject to 
change. Applications and all supporting materials should be submitted as early as pos- 
sible. In general, materials for fall admission should be submitted and received by May 
31; for spring admission, by October 15; and for summer admission, by March 31. These 
dates will normally assure an admission decision in time for enrollment in the designated 
semester; however, specific program deadlines take precedence. For program deadlines 
contact the program coordinator or the Graduate School. 

REAPPLICATION 

A graduate student who has not been enrolled for a period of two semesters will be classi- 
fied as inactive. To resume graduate study, the student must reapply for admission. Some 
programs may have shorter periods before classifying the student as inactive. 

UNDERGRADUATE SENIORS 

SSU seniors near completion of their baccalaureate degree may apply for admission to the 
Office of Graduate Studies, which provides limited enrollment privileges. If accepted, they 
will be changed to regular or other appropriate status upon confirmation of the degree 
award. It is the student's responsibility to inform the Office of Graduate Studies. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

International students must submit complete credentials and detailed information before 
being considered for admission. Requirements are: 

• Application form 

• Application Fee: nonrefundable $25.00 fee must be received. 



30 



• Application Record: originals or certified official copies, with certified English 
translations, of the application's entire academic record in secondary school, 
college or university, showing level of achievement that satisfied the admis- 
sion requirements of the Graduate School and the degree program to which the 
student seeks admission, must be sent to SSU. 

• English Proficiency Certification: applicants whose native language is not Eng- 
lish must submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
with the application. The applicant must achieve a score of 523 on the paper 
version and 193 on the computer-based version. These minimum scores are 
required even if the applicant completed a baccalaureate degree at a U.S. col- 
lege or university. Applicants will not be admitted or allowed to enroll until 
the requirement is met. 

• Financial Statement: students must provide certified proof they are financially 
capable of pursuing an education in this country. 

• Health and Accident Insurance: admitted students must have proof of health 
and accident insurance coverage. Purchase must be made on arrival at the 
University. 

• Tuberculosis Screening: All international applicants will be expected to comply 
with Department of Georgia Health directive concerning tuberculosis screen- 
ing. 

• Change of University: applications transferring from another institution with- 
in the U.S. must submit a Transfer and Visa Form for International Students 
completed by the applicant and the foreign student advisor of the institution 
the applicant is currently attending. 

• No action will be taken on an application for admission until all credentials 
have been received. Other important considerations are: 

• Housing Facilities: SSU has limited on-campus housing. 

• Employment: U.S. immigration laws do not permit international students to 
apply for permission to accept off-campus employment until they have been in 
this country one year. 

• Students who received their undergraduate degree from an institution outside 
of the United States must have the transcripts evaluated and/or translated. 

CATEGORIES OF GRADUATE ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted in one of these categories: 

• Regular (degree-seeking): Completed and submitted all admission materials; 
meets the Office of Graduate Studies, has been recommended by the graduate 
program in which the student proposes to study, and approved by the Office of 
Graduate Studies. 

• Provisional (degree-seeking): Submitted all admission materials; do not meet 
all admission requirements. Will be dismissed during the first 9 graduate 
hours if GPA is not at 3.0 or satisfactory progress is not being made toward this 
GPA. 



31 



Non-degree admission requirements vary by department. Please see department informa- 
tion for specific requirements. However, applicants who possess a baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited college or university may enroll as a post-baccalaureate student after 
submitting an official college/university transcript showing completion of a baccalaure- 
ate degree. Departments limit the number of graduate courses taken and the number of 
graduate credits a student can earn as a non-degree student. This category is temporary, 
and applicants must complete an application for admission. Non-degree students must 
satisfy all prerequisites before enrolling in a course. 

ADVISEMENT 

Advisement procedures and arrangements vary between programs, but generally the pro- 
gram coordinator will work with each student to develop an approved program of study. 

REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT 

The University's registration information is posted online at http://www.savstate.edu. 

COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate student must be enrolled for a minimum of nine credit hours or more 
per semester. A full-time graduate student who has been awarded a graduate assistant- 
ship must enroll in a minimum of six credit hours. Graduate students may not take more 
than twelve credit hours per semester excluding the summer semester during which they 
may take a maximum of nine credit hours. Exceptions must be approved by the respective 
dean upon the recommendation of the department head. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES 

The University's schedule change procedures and deadlines are available at http://www. 
savstate.edu (Academic Calendar). 

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL 

The university reserves the right to withdraw any students who do not meet financial 
obligations or required standards of graduate scholarship. 

TIME LIMITATION 

All requirements for the degree must be completed within seven years. This may not ap- 
ply to certificates, based upon recommendation of the advisor. An extension of time may 
be granted by the respective dean in cases of unusual circumstances. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE PROGRAMS 

A program of study must be maintained by the academic unit for each degree-provisional 
or degree-regular student. The program study, signed by the student, advisor, and pro- 
gram coordinator, must be forwarded to the dean of the Office of Graduate Studies accom- 
panying the student's Application for Graduation. No credit for courses with a grade of D, 
F, or U will apply to the program of study; Credit hours may vary by program of study. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Graduate credit may be granted for equivalent course work from other institutions, with 
approval of the appropriate coordinator. See degree programs for additional information. 
Transfer grades are not computed as part of a student's GPA. 

NUMBERING SYSTEM FOR COURSES 

Courses with 5000-level numbers are dual-listed (4000/5000) for both undergraduate and 



32 



graduate credit. That is, each 5000-level graduate course has a parallel 4000-level un- 
dergraduate course. SSU students who have completed a 4000 level class as part of a 
Baccalaureate degree cannot receive credit toward a graduate degree by enrolling in the 
dual 5000 level course. Courses with numbers 6000 or above are designated exclusively for 
graduate students. Numbers 1000-4999 (undergraduate courses) are not in this Catalog. 

MAJOR CODES FOR GRADUATE DEGREES AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Degrees 

Master of Marine Sciences MSMS 

Master of Public Administration MPA 

Master of Social Work MSW 

Master of Science in Urban Studies MSUS 

Certificate Programs 

Adult Education AEC 

Geographic Information System GISC 

Nonprofit Management NPMC 

REPEATED COURSES 

When a graduate course is repeated, the first grade remains part of the record and is 
computed in the final graduate grade point average. Students will only be allowed one op- 
portunity to repeat a graduate course. 

GRADES AND GRADING POLICIES 

Graduate programs utilize the standard grading scale unless otherwise noted. In all cases 
grading scales and evaluations are clearly outlined in course syllabi. Grade reports are 
issued directly to the student at the end of each semester. The following grade report will 
be used for completed graduate credit: 

Grade Honor Points 

A Excellent 4.0 

B Good 3.0 

C Satisfactory 2.0 

D Unacceptable 1.0 



CALCULATION OF GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

All applicants must calculate separate grade point averages for the following categories: 
(1) all courses taken for the baccalaureate; (2) all credits earned after the first 60 credits for 
the baccalaureate; (3) credits that constitute the undergraduate major; and (4) all credits 
taken beyond the bachelor's degree. All grades are to be converted to a four-point grading 
system. All numerical, alphabetical or equivalent grads must be calculated as follows: 

• Multiply quarter credit hours by (.66) to convert to semester credit hours. 

• Multiply the number of semester credit hours for each course by the number 
of quality or honor points earned, as follows: A=4; B=3; C=2; D=l; F=0. If the 
applicant attended an institution that assigned quality points to represent + or 
- grades, he or she should utilize such information in computing his or her GPA. 

• Divide the total number of quality points by the total number of semester 
credit hours. The quotient will be your grade point average. 



33 



ACADEMIC PROBABION AND STANDING 

A student who falls below a 3.0 overall grade point average upon completion of nine semes- 
ter hours approved by the graduate program will be placed on academic probation. A 3.0 
grade point average must be earned upon completion of an additional nine semester hours 
to have the academic probation removed. Failure to achieve a 3.0 overall grade point aver- 
age will result in the student being academically dismissed from graduate studies. 

SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY AND CONFERENCE COURSES 

Only nine credit hours of independently-taught course work, directed study, and confer- 
ence course work may apply to a degree upon approval of program coordinator. 

AUDIT 

Students who audit courses must follow regular admission and registration procedures, 
pay full tuition and fees, and are subject to the University's academic policies. Audited 
courses may not be changed to credit after the schedule adjustment period has ended. 

IN PROGRESS (IP) GRADE 

An In Progress grade (IP) is used for classes such as thesis, dissertation and other similar 
classes that have a time obligation that is longer than the traditional semester or session. 

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES PROCEDURES 

Graduate programs have established processes for appeal of admission decisions and 
other academic matters. Admission matters are handled by the appropriate Graduate 
Program Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies Dean. Other matters may 
involve the appropriate department chairperson or college dean. 

A student may appeal admission, progression, and graduation decisions. The student will 
be required to complete the appeal form and provide additional information. Contact the 
Office of Graduate Studies for appeal information and procedures. 

GRADUATE STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 

This Committee shall make recommendations to the Graduate Council on matters per- 
taining to graduate student admissions, progression (including exclusion, suspension, and 
graduation), student appeals and other graduate student issues (including graduate as- 
sistants and graduate students programs). [Source: Savannah State University Graduate 
Council By Laws] 

GRADE APPEALS 

Appeals for a change of grade may be initiated through the head of the appropriate aca- 
demic department prior to midterm of the semester after the grade was received, in ac- 
cordance with their regulations of Savannah State University. A student who contests a 
grade will have the following line of appeal: 

• The student will discuss the contested grade with the instructor involved. 

• If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will meet with the depart- 
ment chair and the instructor. If the dispute is with the department chair, the 
student will meet with the dean of the college and the department chair. A 
memorandum for the record will be prepared by the department chair (or dean) 
which will include the substance of the conversations during the meeting. The 
student will receive a copy upon request. 



34 



If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will present his or her 
appeal in writing to the Department chair or the dean of the college, as appli- 
cable, who will then request the dean of Graduate Studies to appoint a review 
panel to hear the appeal. 




35 

STUDENT FEES AND FINANCIAL POLICIES 

TUITION FEES (PER SEMESTER) 



GRADUATE FEE SCHEDULE 
FALL 2004 - SPRING 2005 





DAY STUDENTS 




FEES PER SEMESTER 


IN-STATE TUITION 


OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 


Tuition (12 or more credit hours) 


$1,393.00 


$5,573.00 


Health Fee 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$41.00 


$41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$173.00 


$173.00 


Technology Fee 


$35.00 


$35.00 


Total 


$1,702.00 


$5,882.00 



BOARDING STUDENTS 
FEES PER SEMESTER IN-STATE TUITION OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 



Tuition (12 or more credit hours) 


$ 1,393.00 


$5,573.00 


Health Fee 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$41.00 


$41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$173.00 


$173.00 


Technology Fee 


$35.00 


$35.00 


Board 


$1,240.00 


$1,240.00 


Room 


$1,068.00 


$1,068.00 


Total 


$4,010.00 


$8,190.00 



Fees are due and payable at registration. Please make a personal check, cashier's check, 
bank or postal money order 

Payable to Savannah State University. Separate checks should be made for cash allow- 
ances, books and supplies. 

Books and supplies cost approximately $350.00 Per semester. Late fee is $50.00. 

OTHER FEES 

Key Replacement $20.00 Per Occurrence 

Meal Card Replacement $20.00 Per Occurrence 

Post Office Box Rental $8.00 Per Year (No Charge For Boarding Students) Parking 

- Day $10.00 Per Year 

Parking - Boarding $18.00 Per Year 

Room Deposit $200.00 (Refundable Upon Vacating Room Without Damages) 

Transcript Fees $4.00 Each 



36 



HOUSING RATES 

Single Occupancy Room $1,268.00 (Per Semester) 

Double Occupancy Room $1,068.00 (Per Semester) 

Freshman Living Learning Center Clusters 

Two Person $1,900.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Person (Double) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Person (Double as Single) $2,000.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Single) $1,700.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double) $1,600.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double as Single) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 

American Campus Community - University Village 

One Bedroom Apartment $2,350.00 (Per Semester) 

Two Bedroom Apartment $2,090.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Bedroom Apartment $1,865.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Bedroom Apartment $1,965.00 (Per Semester) 

(With Range) 

FOOD SERVICES 
Boarding Students 

5 meals per week $434.00 

14 meals per week $867.00 

20 meals per week $1,240.00 

Commuter Plans 

10 meals per semester $47.00 

25 meals per semester $117.00 

50 meals per semester $231.00 

100 meals per semester $341.00 

The university reserves the right to make changes in its fees at the beginning of any se- 
mester and without prior notice. Credit cards (VISA and MasterCard) may be used to pay 
for tuition, fees and books. 



REFUND OF FEES POLICY 

Formal withdrawal must begin with a written request in the Office of Academic Affairs. 
Failure to officially withdraw from the institution will result in the forfeiture or loss of any 
refund due. No refunds for reduction in academic loads or student services are allowed 
unless such reductions are necessitated by schedule changes initiated by the University. 
Students suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons are not entitled to a refund of any 
deposits or fees paid. 

Students who are members of the Georgia National Guard or other reserve components of 
the armed forces who receive emergency orders to active duty are entitled to a full refund 
of matriculation fees paid for that semester, in accordance with guidelines promulgated by 
the chancellor. Military personnel on active duty in the armed forces who, before the end 



37 



of their present station assignment, receive emergency orders for a temporary or perma- 
nent change of duty location are entitled to a full refund of tuition paid for that semester, 
in accordance with guidelines promulgated by the chancellor. 

The refund amount for students withdrawing from the institution shall be based on a pro 
rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days in the semester that 
the student has completed by the total calendar days in the semester. The total calendar 
days in a semester includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days 
and any days that a student was on an approved leave of absence. The unearned portion 
shall be refunded up to the point in time that the amount earned equals 60%. 

Students that withdraw from the institution when the calculated percentage of completion 
is greater than 60%, are not entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional charges. 

A refund of all non-resident fees, matriculation fees, and other mandatory fees shall be 
made in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session. 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the Meal Plan Program and the Residence Hall 
must secure written permission from the Auxiliary Services Director. This permission, 
when submitted with the ID, will entitle the student to a refund. Refund of elective charg- 
es (room and board) for withdrawing from the institution during a semester will be made 
on a prorated basis determined by the date of withdrawal. Refunds to students who are 
recipients of Title IV funds will be made in accordance with federal laws and regulations 
in effect at that time. 

The refund amount returned to SFA Programs will be distributed in the following order: 
Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan, Subsidized Direct Stafford Loan, PLUS Loan, Perkins 
Loan, Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, Other Federal, State, Private, Institutional Aid and 
the Student. 

HOUSING 

Graduate students are housed in University Village. Savannah State University has been 
defined by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia as a residential in- 
stitution. This definition means that the University must provide on-campus facilities for 
room and board. All rooms are wired for high speed internet access and cablevision. All 
students who live in the traditional residence halls are required to purchase a twenty-meal 
plan. All University Village four-bedroom, 2-bath apartment units will be required to pur- 
chase a twenty-meal plan or a fourteen-meal plan. Students assigned to these spaces will 
be automatically billed via the Banner Student Information System accordingly. There is 
no refund for missed or carry-overs to another semester during the meal contract period. 
Applications are available from the housing office in University Village. 

ID'S 

New graduate student ID's are made in Room 201 on the second floor of King-Frazier 
Building during scheduled hours. Contact the Office of Center for Residential Services 
and Program for information. 

PARKING 

All vehicles driven on campus must display a university parking decal on the front. All 
students, faculty, and staff are required to become aware of the parking regulations. A set 
of regulations may be obtained in the Public Safety Office or Division of Student Affairs. 



38 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Savannah State University offers the following four graduate programs: 
Master of Science in Marine Sciences 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of Social Work 
Master of Science in Urban Studies 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARINE SCIENCES 

MISSION STATEMENT 

To provide research, education, and outreach programs. To provide a vital technically 
qualified intellectually thoughtful and ethnically diverse community. To creatively solve 
problems and answer questions related to coastal and ocean ecosystem health, environ- 
mental quality, and fisheries sustainability. 

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 

A complete application for admissions consists of a completed application form, statement 
of purpose (more than 500, less than 1000 words, please), two official copies of all tran- 
scripts or date they were requested, official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores, three 
letters of recommendation (enclosed in sealed envelopes), and Certificate of Immunization 
for students who would reside on campus. 




ADMISSIONS 

REGULAR ADMISSION 

Applicants may be granted regular admission 
provided they have met the following minimum 
degree program requirements: 

• An undergraduate degree from an accredited 
college on file in the Office of Graduate Studies 
and Sponsored Research 

• An acceptable grade point average (3.0 pre- 
ferred, 2.5 minimum*) 

• Acceptable combined Verbal and Quantitative 
GRE scores (1,000 preferred, 750 minimum*) 

A student may be granted regular admission with 
deficiencies. Deficiencies must be completed with- 
in the period specified in the acceptance letter. 

*MSMS Admissions Committee evaluates all 
scores (GRE, GPA, letter of recommendation, 
essay) in admissions decisions. 



39 



PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Applicants who do not meet the requirements for regular admission may be considered 
for provisional admission. Provisionally admitted students are allowed to take a total of 
up to nine hours of graduate credit. If requirements for full admission are met prior to 
completion of nine credit hours and the student has demonstrated progress in their thesis 
research, the Provisional Status Review Committee can recommend full admittance before 
nine credit hours have been earned. If requirements for full admission have not been met 
and/or significant progress in thesis research has not been demonstrated by the time nine 
credit hours have been received, the Provisional Status Review Committee can recom- 
mend removal of the student from the program. 

Mechanisms for Change of Admission Status from Provisional to Regular: 

At the termination of a provisional student's first nine credit hours of study within the 
MSMS Program, the Provisional Status Review Committee must make a recommendation 
to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research to either grant full admission to 
the student or remove the student from the program. All provisional students are required 
to submit progress reports to the Provisional Status Review Committee on the second 
Monday of every December and May and the last Monday of July. See the Provisional 
Document for details of the progress report contents. 

To be considered for removal from provisional status, a student must maintain a B average 
in all graduate courses taken in the MSMS Program and obtain a grade of B or better in 
all core courses. In addition, the following requirements may apply depending on reasons 
for admittance with provisional status. 

NON-DEGREE (SPECIAL) ADMISSION 

Non-degree students can apply up to 8 semester hours of graduate credit taken at SSU to 
the MSMS program curriculum requirements if they are admitted to the program. Only 6 
semester hours of approved graduate coursework not taken at SSU may be applied to the 
MSMS program curriculum requirements. Courses must have been passed with a B or 
better and must be approved by the students' thesis committee prior to the thesis proposal 
defense. 

ORIENTATION 

New students will be provided with all of the policies, procedures, forms and information 
necessary to complete the degree no later than the first day of classes of the first semester 
of enrollment in the program. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Degree Requirements 

All students will be required to take the twelve-hour required core curriculum as listed be- 
low. This core will provide a strong, broad multidiscipline investigation of marine sciences 
with emphasis on coastal environments. Through seminar and technical writing and com- 
munication courses, students will investigate marine issues and develop professional skills 
in critical thinking, logical interpretations and professional-quality presentations. With 
this common core background, the program of study provides three major tracks: Track 1 

- Traditional Marine Science Research, Track 2 - Applied Marine Sciences, and Track 3 

- Professional Advancement. Each track, chosen by the student in consultation with an 
advisor and committee, has specific curriculum requirements as well as options for courses 
within three curricular areas: a) Policy and Law, b) Research Tools, and c) Science. 

Track 1, Traditional Marine Science Research, is designed for students: a) who plan to 



40 



obtain a M.S. degree in Marine Sciences and continue into a Ph.D. program, or b) who wish 
to obtain a traditional research-based MS degree. Curriculum emphasis in this track is on 
science and original research. 

Track 2, Applied Marine Sciences, is designed for students who wish to obtain a MS de- 
gree in Marine Sciences which provides them with the opportunity to learn and develop 
scientific skills applicable to marine science related industries, resource management, 
fisheries, aquaculture, and research. Curriculum emphasis in this track is on the acquisi- 
tion of research tools and applied skills. 

Track 3, Professional Advancement, is designed for students who are presently employed 
in a related field and wish to earn a masters degree in Marine Sciences for possible pro- 
fessional development and advancement. Examples of these students are presently em- 
ployed science teachers, federal, state and local government agency personnel, and per- 
sons currently working in industry and the private sector. The curriculum in this track 
requires the student to take courses from all three curricula areas and allows additional 
flexibility for additional courses, which are most applicable to his/her, particular profes- 
sional development needs. 

General Requirements 

Each track requires 30 semester hours of graduate level coursework in addition to six 
credit hours of thesis research and preparation. An entering student must have passed 
an undergraduate calculus courses with a grade of 'C or better or else must take such a 
course, which would not count toward the graduate course requirements. An advisor and 
an advisory committee will guide each student. 

Core Curriculum (12 hours) 

MSCI 5201 Introduction to Marine Sciences (4) 
MSCI 5202 Introduction to Coastal Oceanography (4) 
MSCI 5401 Technical Writing and Communication (3) 
MSCI 5402 Research/Marine Science Seminar (1) 

Track I - Traditional Research: Course Requirements 

MSCI 5560 Advanced Environmetrics 
At least one course from "Policy and Law" 
At least one course from "Research Tools" 
At least two courses from "Science" 
MSCI 7991 Thesis I 
MSCI 7992 Thesis II 

Track II - Applied Science: Course Requirements 

MSCI 5560 Advanced Environmetrics 
At least one course from "Policy and Law" 
At least two courses from "Research Tools" 
At least one course from "Science" 
MSCI 7991 Thesis I 
MSCI 7992 Thesis II 

Track III - Professional Advancement: Course Requirements 

At least one course from "Policy and Law" 
At least one course from "Research Tools" 
At least one course from "Science" 
MSCI 7991 Thesis I 
MSCI 7992 Thesis II 



41 



Policy and Law 

MSCI 6310 Scientific Ethics (3-0-3) 
MSCI 6323 Coastal Law and Policy (3-0-3) 
MSCI 6324 Coastal Zone Management (3-0-3) 
MSCI 7344 Fisheries Management (3-0-3) 

Research Tools 

MSCI 5560 Advanced Environmetrics (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6542 Fisheries Population Dynamics (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6546 Mariculture (2-0-2) 

MSCI 6550 Analytical Techniques in Seawater, Sediments and Soils (0-3-3) 

MSCI 6552 Marine Biotechnology (3-1-4) 

MSCI 6562 Remote Sensing (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7527 Coastal Environmental Certifications (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7564 Geographic Information Systems and Database Management in Coastal 

Studies (3-1-4) 

Science 

MSCI 5501 Fish Ecology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6201 Marine Ecology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6202 Advanced Oceanography (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6550 Analytical Techniques in Seawater, Sediments and Soils (0-3-3) 

MSCI 6552 Marine Biotechnology (3-1-4) 

MSCI 6562 Remote Sensing (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6725 Coastal Wetland Ecology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6726 Coastal Botany (3-1-4) 

MSCI 6745 Aquatic Pathology (3-1-4) 

MSCI 6747 Marine Mammology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 6781 Benthic Ecology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7527 Coastal Environmental Certifications (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7562 Advanced Seminar in Remote Sensing (2-1-3) 

MSCI 7728 Coastal Processes (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7743 Fisheries Oceanography (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7754 Marine Biogeochemistry (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7782 Marine Microbial Ecology (3-0-3) 

MSCI 7783 Water Column Ecology (3-0-3) 

Other Courses 

MSCI 7801 Directed Research (0-(l-3)-(l-3)) 
MSCI 7851 Special Topics ((l-3)-0-(l-3)) 
MSCI 7991 Thesis I (3-0-3) 
MSCI 7992 Thesis II (3-0-3) 



42 



GRADE REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS 

Scholastic Warning/Academic Probation 

A regularly admitted graduate student whose GPA falls below 3.0 in a given semester will 
receive a letter of scholastic warning from the University placing the student on Academic 
Probation. 

Academic Termination 

The following are grounds for Academic Termination from the graduate program: 

A provisionally admitted student fails to achieve a 3.0 GPA after nine semester hours of 
course work. 

A regularly admitted student who is on academic probation fails to achieve a 3.0 GPA after 
nine additional semester hours of course work. 

NOTE: With the exception of core courses and students who have provisional status, the 
number of C's a student earns during their course is irrelevant as long as a cumulative 3.0 
GPA is maintained. 

All students in the MSMS Program are expected to complete the four core courses (listed 
below) with a grade of B or better. 

MSMS Core Courses: 

MSCI 5201 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3-1-4) 
MSCI 5202 Introduction to Coastal Oceanography (3-1-4) 
MSCI 5401 Technical Writing and Communication (3-0-3) 
MSCI 5402 Research/Marine Science Seminar (1-0-1) 

Students who receive grades of B or better in the core courses need not take a qualifying 
exam. They should, however, be prepared to answer integrative questions on concepts 
presented in the core courses at their defense in addition to questions specific to their 
thesis research. 

If a student fails to achieve a grade of B or higher in one of the MSMS core courses, he/she 
will have one opportunity to pass a written qualifying exam in that core area. The exam 
will be designed by the professor(s) who taught the core course in which unsatisfactory 
progress was made and will be designed to test competency in that core area. It is the 
responsibility of the student to seek guidance on preparing for the exam from the relevant 
faculty member (s). 

Scheduling of qualifying exams will be done by the MSMS Program Coordinator in con- 
junction with relevant faculty members and students. Qualifying exams will be offered 
once per semester. The exam should be scheduled no earlier than one month after the 
receipt of the unsatisfactory grade (< B) to ensure ample preparation time. The qualify- 
ing exam should also be offered well in advance of the start of the semester in which the 
relevant course(s) will next be taught. 

The qualifying exam will be in written format with approximately one-half day allotted 
per exam. 

The qualifying exam will be initially evaluated by the course instructor. If it falls into a 
potentially failing category based on the instructor's evaluation, it will be evaluated by no 



43 



less than three faculty members including the instructor for the course, the thesis advisor, 
and the coordinator of the program. For cases in which there is overlap (e.g. thesis advisor 
is coordinator) another faculty member will be selected to serve on the committee. 

Students who pass the qualifying exam need not retake the course. If the written exam 
is not passed prior to the subsequent semester in which the relevant core course is of- 
fered, then the student will be required to reenroll in the course and achieve a B or better. 
Students who do not pass the course the second time with a 'B' or 'A' will be recommended 
for academic termination from the degree program. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

A temporary advisor and the thesis advisor must be a member of the graduate faculty at 
SSU. The thesis advisor must be a full graduate faculty member. An advisory committee 
consists of at least three advisory members, of which at least two are graduate faculty 
members based at Savannah State University. Upon approval by the advisory committee, 
an original-work major paper may be substituted for a research thesis for students follow- 
ing tracks 2 or 3. In either case, thesis or major paper, a "proposal of research" must be 
submitted by the student and approved by the student's advisor and advisory committee. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Applicants and students may apply for financial assistance in the form of Research 
Fellowships, Teaching Assistantships, research awards, and travel awards. See a marine 
science faculty member to inquire further about funding opportunities. 

THESIS PROPOSAL 

The thesis proposal must be presented to and approved by the thesis committee in the 
form of a formal written document and an oral presentation. This must be done by the 
end of the 2nd semester of study (e.g. 1st Monday of May for those entering in the fall 
semester) for full-time students. The timeline for part-time students is at the discretion 
of the advisor and committee. The proposal should clearly describe the problem or ques- 
tions to be addressed by the research with clearly stated hypotheses, the methodology to 
be used, a preliminary literature review, and a timeline for project completion. A state- 
ment of needed equipment, supplies, and travel required for the project and how these 
items will be funded should also be included. This document is not meant to restrict the 
student from pursuing different avenues as opportunities arise within their research, but 
to provide a clear initial guideline for the committee's input and approval. Once the thesis 
proposal and the initial draft of the "Application for Candidacy" form (see below) including 
curriculum track and courses -see Plan of Study Approval below) are approved/signed by 
the committee, a student is eligible to enroll in Thesis I. 

PLAN OF STUDY APPROVAL 

At the time that the thesis proposal is presented to the thesis committee, an initial draft of 
the "Application for Candidacy" form should be presented to and approved by the commit- 
tee. This ensures that the courses taken by a student are approved by the committee as 
relevant to their particular needs and goals and that the student is on track to graduate in 
a timely manner. This document is to be submitted to the MSMS Program Director with 
an attached copy of transcripts (official or unofficial) from SSU graduate study and tran- 
scripts from any off campus graduate work to be applied to the degree. Deviations from 
this initial plan of study may occur due to restrictions in course offerings. If this occurs, 
the advisor and committee must approve the revised plan of study and the advisor must 
initial any course substitutions made on the original "Application for Candidacy" form 
prior to course registration. The form can then be updated, printed again, and used as the 
official Application for Admission to Candidacy for the Master's Degree (see below). 



44 



THESIS DEFENSE 

The thesis defense shall consist of two parts: 1) an oral presentation open to the public 
with a question and answer period; followed by 2) a thesis evaluation attended only by 
the committee members and the student. The oral presentation must be advertised two 
weeks in advance. The purpose of the private thesis defense is mainly, but not exclusively, 
to address any outstanding concerns based on the oral presentation, to review substan- 
tive changes to the penultimate draft submitted before the defense; and to ask questions 
that will help determine the readiness of the student to graduate. The committee can set 
future writing deadline(s) to assist student in graduating on time. Scheduling a defense 
before the graduation deadline does not ensure that the candidate will graduate as all 
committee members must sign the thesis cover page attesting that they approve the final 
written version. 

APPLICATION FOR CANDIDACY 

The Application for Admission to Candidacy for the Master of Science in Marine Sciences 
Degree form must be submitted by the advisor for processing prior to scheduling of thesis 
defense. 

All degree program forms and instructions are available from the Program Director. 

THESIS AND DEFENSE DEADLINES 

• The thesis defense which includes a public presentation of thesis in seminar 
series format followed by a thesis committee meeting must be scheduled no 
later than six (6) weeks prior to the date graduating students' grades are due 
in the registrar's office (see academic calendar). 

• A penultimate draft of the thesis must be submitted to thesis committee mem- 
bers no later than three (3) weeks prior to the scheduled thesis defense date. 
The penultimate draft is the next to final version in a series of versions of the 
thesis which the thesis committee has reviewed. The final version is the one 
containing the signed thesis signature page that will be submitted to the Dean 
of Graduate Studies. 

For information on thesis processing see the Thesis Guide. For copies of and questions 
concerning the Application for Candidacy and thesis defense deadlines see the Director 
of the MSMS Program. For copies of and questions concerning the Thesis Guide see the 
Dean, Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research. 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

MISSION STATEMENT 

Consistent with Savannah State University's unique and historic mission as one of three 
historically Black colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia, the Master 
of Public Administration program seeks to be the program of choice for non-traditional 
managers in our region, while offering traditional managers opportunities to learn in a 
multicultural environment. The Master of Public Administration program at Savannah 
State University seeks to: 

• Prepare public managers to assume management and leadership positions in a 
variety of organizational settings in Coastal Georgia and beyond. 

• Advance the knowledge base in the field of public administration through 
scholarly research and publications. 



45 



• Serve the profession and community by using our expertise and intellectual 
resources to address needs in our service areas. 

The MPA Program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs 
and Administration (NASPAA). 



APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 

Persons seeking admission to the MPA program must hold a baccalaureate degree from 
an accredited institution, with a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average, and show 
promise of high quality work on the graduate level. While there is no specific undergradu- 
ate course of study for admission, students must meet the prerequisites for courses in 
American National Government and statistics. Students may begin the program during 
the Fall and Spring terms. Only completed applications are reviewed by the Admissions 
Committee. 

A completed application consists of the following: 

The application forms 

Two official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts 

Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (general test), or 
other acceptable standardized test taken within the past five years 

A 500-1000 word biography and statement of purpose 

Three letters of reference 

A one-page resume 

A certificate of immunization is required only for graduate students who reside 
in on campus housing. 

ADMISSIONS 

To be granted regular admission status, a student must average a minimum of 90 points 
on the applicant evaluation form as scored by the Admissions Committee. The program 
has two admissions categories: regular and provisional. An in person interview is sched- 
uled when determined by the Admission Committee. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Applicants who score under 90 on the admissions formula may be granted provisional 
status. While holding this status, students must take the equivalent of a semester's full 
load of core MPA courses (i.e., 9-12 semester hours) and earn no final course grade below 
"B" to qualify for regular status. Earning a grade of less than "B" in a core course, while 
in provisional status will cause the student to be dismissed from the MPA program. All 
courses taken in provisional status must be approved by the MPA coordinator or depart- 
ment chair. The director will review the files of provisional students after completion of 
nine hours. Under certain circumstances, a student's file may be reviewed at the comple- 
tion of six credit hours. 



46 



NON-DEGREE (SPECIAL) ADMISSION 

Applicants who apply too late for full consideration for admission or have not submitted all 
required documents for evaluation may be assigned non-degree admission status with the 
approval of the graduate Dean. While in this status, a student may register for no more 
than two courses after completing the Non-degree Admission Agreement for Graduate 
Studies. This form requires the signatures of the student and the dean of graduate stud- 
ies. The Admissions Committee does not review files for non-degree students. Any student 
who registers under this agreement understands that no more than two courses taken in 
non-degree status may count towards the MPA degree, and that admission in non-degree 
status is independent of consideration for admission as a regular or provisional student. 
Students admitted in non-degree status are not eligible for financial aid. Students may 
take no more than 15 hours of course work in the provisional and non-degree status com- 
bined. 

FAST TRACK OPTION 

Juniors or Seniors with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and at least 1000 on the SAT may apply 
for admission to the Fast Track program. Applicants to the Fast Track program must sub- 
mit the standard application on or before May 1. Completed applications will be reviewed, 
and a formal decision on admission rendered by the Admissions Committee by May 15. 
Fast Track students may enroll in and receive graduate credit for up to three MPA courses 
(PADM 6830, 6832, and 6840). Six of these credits may also count towards the under- 
graduate degree. A student must earn a grade of "B" or better in each MPA course to be 
allowed to continue in the Fast Track program. All Fast Track students must complete a 
Fast Track Internship Experience the semester following receipt of the bachelor's degree. 
In the student's fifth year, the student must earn 24 MPA course credits. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The Master of Public Administration degree requires the student to successfully complete 
a minimum of 36 credit hours. MPA students are classified as in-service or pre-service 
based on experience in the public or nonprofit sector. Pre-service students are usually 
recent graduates who lack sufficient managerial or administrative experience. In-service 
students are currently employed and usually have several years of relevant work experi- 
ence in the public or non-profit sectors in a job requiring a minimum of a bachelor's degree 
for entry. In-service students may petition for exemption from the internship requirement, 
but must complete the major paper. Designation as pre-service or in-service will be made 
by faculty at the time the student applies for the internship course. 

The program is flexible enough to accommodate full-time (9-12 hours per semester) or 
part-time students (3-6 hours per semester). Accordingly, the length of time required to 
complete the program will vary. All students must successfully complete the core curricu- 
lum of 21 semester hours, 9-12 hours of electives, and 3-6 hours of internship, depending 
upon classification as in-service or pre-service. In selecting the electives, students may 
choose courses from the following: concentrations, (1) Human Resources Development, (2) 
Health Services Administration, (3) General Administration, (4) Non-Profit Management, 
(5) Public Policy, or (6) Coastal Area Management. The Health Services Administration 
Track is offered in collaboration with Armstrong Atlantic State University. Students who 
wish to take any of the elective units outside of the MPA Program must have those elec- 
tives approved by their advisor. The student pursuing the Generalist track may design a 
concentration, in consultation with the MPA program director and their academic advi- 
sor. 



47 



Prerequisites (6 hours) 

Undergraduate course in statistics (3 credits) 

Undergraduate or graduate course in American National Government (3 credits) 

An undergraduate Computer Applications course is highly recommended. 

Core Curriculum (21 hours) 

PADM 6830 History, Scope, and Practice of Public Administration 

PADM 6832 Organizational Theory and Behavior 

PADM 6833 Management of Human Resources in the Public Sector 

PADM 6834 Public Budgeting and Finance 

PADM 6836 State and Local Government Administration or 

PADM 6837 Intergovernmental Relations 

PADM 6839 Statistical Applications for Public Administrators 

PADM 6840 Research Methods in Public Administration 

Concentration (9-12 hours): Students may acquire one of four concentrations: 
Generalist 

Health Service Administration 
Human Resource Development 
Nonprofit Management 
Public Policy 
Coastal Area Resource Management 

Public Service Internship, Major Paper, and Oral Comprehensive Exam 

PADM 6853 Pre-Service Public Service Internship (3 credits) 

PADM 6854 Major Paper (2 credits) 

PADM 6875 Comprehensive Exam Review Seminar (1 credit, taken with PADM 6854). 

PADM 6880 Management of Agencies 

PADM 6882 Managing Resources in the Nonprofit Sector 

PADM 6884 Resource Development and Capacity Building for Nonprofit Agencies 

Oral Exit Comprehensive Exam 

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION 

Students are expected to remain in good academic standing. To be in good standing, a 
graduate student must maintain an institutional cumulative grade point average of 3.0 
or better in all graduate credit courses, and reasonable progress toward graduation re- 
quirements. A student who fails to maintain the required grade point average and make 
reasonable progress will be reviewed by the Office of the Graduate Dean and /or a faculty 
committee appointed by the Department Chair, and may be denied further registration in 
MPA courses. Only credit earned in graduate courses at Savannah State University may 
be used to repair deficiencies in grade point average. 

ADMISSIONS APPEAL 

A student denied admission to the MPA program may appeal the decision in writing to the 
Department chair. The student will be required to provide additional information in sup- 
port of the appeal. A student whose appeal is denied by the MPA program may appeal to 
the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. The final decision on an appeal 
will be made by the Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Programs. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

The Department chair or the coordinator of the MPA program advises all incoming stu- 
dents during their first semester of enrollment. Each student is then assigned to a faculty 
advisor for the remainder of their academic career. The advisor will help the student plan 



48 



a program of study consistent with the student's field and goals and will approve all course 
selections prior to registration. Students are free to discuss courses and career options 
with any member of the faculty, but their advisement forms should be signed by the des- 
ignated faculty member. Students may request a change in advisors by contacting the 
chair in writing. If the request is granted, the student and the advisors will be notified in 
writing. In the spirit of continuous quality improvement, students evaluate advisement 
annually. Their observations are used to improve the advisement process. 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION 

Appropriate orientation to a new graduate program is an important key to success in grad- 
uate studies. All incoming MPA students are required to participate in scheduled group 
orientation programs held at the beginning of the semester and through out the first year 
of enrollment (18 hours). Many questions about the program and institutional resources 
are addressed in the orientation sessions. Individual faculty members also schedule li- 
brary and computer systems orientations for students in introductory classes. 

NON-ACADEMIC SUSPENSION 

Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the standards of the stu- 
dent code of conduct at Savannah State University. The University reserves the right to 
exclude at any time any student whose conduct is deemed improper or unethical, detri- 
mental to the welfare of the college community. Faculty or fellow students in the MPA 
Program may initiate charges against a current student by filing a written charge with the 
Graduate Student Affairs Committee. 

TRANSFER CREDITS 

Up to 9 graduate semester credit hours may be transferred from a graduate institution 
accredited by a regional accrediting body, if the student has earned a "B" or better in each 
course within the past five years. The student requesting transfer credit must provide a 
copy of the following information for each course for which transfer credit is requested: the 
name of the course; catalog description; course syllabus; a letter of recommendation of the 
Dean or the Dean's designee related to the student's status during enrollment at the previ- 
ous or current graduate program. 

INTERNSHIP 

The internship requirement is common among universities and colleges granting degrees 
in public administration and related fields that require the student to have practical field 
experience. The public service internship is an integral part of the student's professional 
education because it provides students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills 
acquired in the course work phase of the program. Pre-service students may be assigned 
to the professional positions in the public or non-profit sectors, and their job performance 
is evaluated periodically by their agency supervisor, in consultation with the internship 
coordinator. At Savannah State University, in-service students are exempted from the 
300-hour internship. An in-service student is a student who, at the time of the internship 
assignment, is holding a job that requires at least a bachelor's degree for entry, and who 
has held that job for at least one year. Students must have completed the core require- 
ments and have a grade point average of 3.0 in the MPA program before enrolling for 
credit in the internship. Students in the Fast Track program will complete two internship 
experiences, one in the semester following receipt of the bachelor's degree (minimum of 
120 hours) and the second after completing the core courses. 

MAJOR PAPER 

Although students in this program are not required to submit a traditional master's de- 
gree thesis, all students must submit and defend a comprehensive paper written as part 



49 



of the internship requirements. Major papers are written in conformance to paper require- 
ments established by the MPA faculty and evaluated by the coordinator and members of 
the student's examining committee. The purpose of the paper is to allow the student to 
demonstrate mastery of the ability to integrate theory and practice into organizational 
analysis or problem-solving. The paper will be typed using the style sheet of the American 
Psychological Association (APA). Generally, the paper will be first submitted to two read- 
ers, one of whom will be the student's advisor (or a designee appointed by the program 
director), and the other, the chair of the student's examining committee. Upon approval 
of the first draft, the student may qualify to defend the paper at the comprehensive ex- 
amination. The final copy of the paper, with recommended changes, must be submitted to 
the members of the examining committee at least one week before final grades are due for 
graduating students. The first draft must be approved by midterm of the year the student 
plans to graduate. 

EXIT EXAMINATION 

A terminal oral comprehensive examination is required of all candidates for the degree 
of Master of Public Administration. The oral examination includes a defense of the major 
paper. The Department chair or designee will name the members of the committee, set 
the date, time, and place of the examination, and notify all parties in writing. Students 
must complete all core courses and the internship (major) paper before scheduling the oral 
examination. The examiners will be three full-time MPA faculty members. 

STUDENT OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT 

The Master of Public Administration Program is committed to offering a high quality edu- 
cational experience. Students are expected to participate in a variety of methods used to 
assess learning outcomes. 




50 



MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

A UNIVERSITY CENTER OF EXCELLENCE 

The Master of Social Work (MSW) Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work 
Education. The MSW program is designed to prepare students for entry into advanced 
social work practice. The 60 credit-hour degree program consists of a foundation cur- 
riculum which provides knowledge, values, and skills common to generalist social work 
practice, concentration courses in clinical practice or social administration, and three field 
practicum courses which are designed to enhance the competencies in the foundation and 
concentration areas. The Department was selected by the University's faculty and admin- 
istration as a Center of Excellence for the University. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Department of Social Work is the prepare students to excel in social 
work practice. The BSW program prepares students for generalist practice and the MSW 
program builds on the generalist foundation and prepares students for advanced practice 
in Clinical and Social Administration. The Department promotes student focused learn- 
ing, incorporates an Afrocentric perspective and graduates students who are culturally 

competent to practice social work in 
rural, urban, and global settings. 

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the MSW program is on 
a selective basis. Prospective students 
apply to the Graduate Admissions 
Office. The completed application is 
sent to the Social Work Admissions 
Committee for evaluation. The com- 
mittee makes its recommendations to 
the MSW Program Coordinator. 

Completed admission applications 
are evaluated according to the follow- 
ing criteria: 

A baccalaureate degree with liberal arts courses in the social sciences, behav- 
ioral sciences, natural sciences, biological sciences, and humanities from an 
accredited college or university 




Grade point average (GPA) of 2.8 on a 4.0 scale for regular admission 

Grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 on a 4.0 scale for Advanced Standing 

Minimum GRE score of 850 

Official transcript(s) direct from all colleges/universities attended 

Official Graduate Application with Directed Essay 

Three letters of reference (academic and/or professional persons) 

An in-person interview is scheduled when determined by admissions committee 



51 



REGULAR FULL TIME ADMISSION 

Regular admission requires students to satisfy the GRE (850) and GPA (2.8) requirements. 
This is a two-year 60 credit hour program with students completing 15 credit hours per 
semester. The Full Time curriculum begins in the fall semester. 

ADVANCED STANDING ADMISSION 

Only students who have earned the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree from a CSWE 
accredited program are eligible for the Advanced Standing admission. Students must sat- 
isfy the GRE (850) and the GPA (3.3) requirements. The Advanced Standing curriculum 
begins in May. Students admitted into the Advanced Standing program who fail to earn a 
grade of "B" in any course will be removed from Advanced Standing. The student may be 
given the option of continuing in the regular two-year MSW degree program. The student 
will not be allowed back in the Advanced Standing curriculum. 

PART TIME ADMISSION 

Part Time admission is available for students who want to earn the MSW degree. The cur- 
riculum is designed for students to complete the degree within 3 l A years. The Part Time 
curriculum begins in the fall semester. Students are strongly encouraged to remain with 
the Part Time curriculum once admitted. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Applicants who want to obtain the MSW degree, but do not fully satisfy the requirements 
for admission may be given consideration for provisional admission status. Provisional 
Admission may be granted to applicants whose GRE score and/or GPA fall below the mini- 
mum required for admission. The student must earn a grade of "B" in each course during 
the first semester of enrollment in order to remain the MSW Program. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

The Department of Social Work may accept up to 30 credit hours for transfer. Transfer 
credit may be granted if the applicant meets the following: 

• All admission requirements for the MSW Program and Savannah State Uni- 
versity Graduate School requirements 

• MSW course(s) completed in a CSWE approved program within the last five 
years 

• A minimum grade of "B" earned in each course for transfer credit 

• Inclusion of catalog description for each requested course for transfer credit 

• Course outline or syllabus, including bibliography for each requested transfer 
course 

• A letter of recommendation from the Chair of the Department related to the 
student's enrollment status at the previous or current Social Work Program. 

TERMINATION FOR ACADEMIC AND NON-ACADEMIC REASONS 

In terminating a Master of Social Work Student for Academic and Non-Academic rea- 
sons, the Department of Social Work follows the University procedures as outlined in the 
University Catalog, the MSW Student Handbook, and the University Student Conduct 
Code. These documents contain the established policies and procedures for handling cas- 
es, instances and grievances related to failure to maintain academic standards, academic 
misconduct and violation of the student conduct codes. 



52 



It is the goal of the Department of Social Work to select students and operate in a proactive 
manner to minimize the acceptance of students who are later determined to be unsuit- 
able for the profession. It is recognized, however, that in spite of the most conscientious 
screening efforts by the Admissions Committee and the faculty group process, there may 
be instances in which an applicant is later determined to be unsuitable for the profession. 
Issues related to violation of the NASW Code of Ethics, emotional immaturity, lack of pro- 
fessional development, exhibited in the academic environment of the field practicum will 
be investigated by a faculty review team appointed by the MSW Program Coordinator in 
consultation with the Depart Chair. The review team assesses whether the events, situa- 
tions, and/or behaviors indicate current or potential problems/harm or danger for the stu- 
dent, Department, College, University, client, agency, colleagues, and/or the community. 

SUSPENSION 

Students are expected to remain in good standing in the MSW Program. To be in good 
standing, a graduate student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or 
better in all graduate credit courses, and reasonable progress toward graduate program 
requirements. A student who fails to maintain reasonable progress is subject to review 
by the Social Work Performance Review Committee, appointed by the MSW Program 
Coordinator in consultation with the Department Chair, and may be denied further regis- 
tration in social work courses. 

Academic credit for life and previous work experience is not considered in whole or in part 
or 'in lieu of the above admissions' requirements or in lieu of any courses for field practi- 
cum requirements. 

ORIENTATION 

A required orientation to the MSW Program is held at the beginning of the fall semester 
during the registration period. All MSW students are required to attend orientation. 



DUAL CONCENTRATION 

Students are permitted to pursue a Dual 
Concentration. Students must declare a 
concentration by the second semester of 
full time enrollment or four semesters of 
part time enrollments. 

FIELD PRACTICUM 

Field practicum is an integral part of 
social work education. The experience 
offers an opportunity for students to in- 
tegrate and apply theoretical knowledge 
and social work practice skills in di- 
verse human service settings under the 
instruction of approved agency based 
social workers. Affiliation agreements 
between the University and human ser- 
vice organizations are established for 
educational purposes. 




MSW students must complete 1000 clock hours of field practicum for a total of 12 semes- 
ter credit hours. After the completion of the first semester of course work, the founda- 
tion practicum is offered, typically, at 20 hours a week for 300 hours (4 credits). In the 
advanced year, the concentration field practicum is offered, typically at 24 hours a week 



53 



for two semesters for a total of 700 hours (4 credits each). Field practicum is taken concur- 
rently with social work practice classes. In the advanced year, field learning experiences 
are focused on students' declared concentration (Clinical Practice, Social Administration 
Practice, or Dual Concentration). 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Core Curriculum (31 hours) 

SOWK 5501 Law, Race and Poverty in the Welfare of Children 

(3 hours-Required for First Year IV- E Child Welfare Recipients) 
MSWK 6650 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3 hours) 
MSWK 6651 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3 hours) 
MSWK 6652 Cultural Diversity and Social Work Practice (3 hours) 
MSWK 6660 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families (3 hours) 
MSWK 6661 Social Work Practice with Groups, Communities, and Organizations 

(3 hours) 
MSWK 6670 Research Methods I (3 hours) 
MSWK 6680 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3 hours) 
MSWK 6690 Field Practicum I (4 hours) 
MSWK 6782 Advanced Policy and Planning (3 hours) 
Elective (3 hours) 

Concentrations (Choose One) 

Clinical Social Work Concentration (29 hours) 

MSWK 6750 Clinical Practice I (3 hours) 

MSWK 6751 Clinical Practice II (3 hours) 

MSWK 6752 Crisis Intervention and Brief Therapy (3 hours) 

MSWK 6762 Mental Health Issues with Adults: Psychopathology (3 hours) 

MSWK 6760 Research Methods II (3 hours) 

MSWK 6790 Field Practicum II (4 hours) 

MSWK 6791 Field Practicum III (4 hours) 

MSWK 6805 Integrative Seminar (3 hours) 

Electives (3 hours) 

Social Administration Concentration (29 hours) 

MSWK 6780 Social Administration I (3 hours) 

MSWK 6781 Social Administration II (3 hours) 

MSWK 6834 Public Budgeting and Finance (3 hours) 

MSWK 6762 Mental Health Issues with Adults: Psychopathology ( 3 hours) 

MSWK 6760 Research Methods II (3 hours) 

MSWK 6790 Field Practicum II (4 hours) 

MSWK 6791 Field Practicum III (4 hours) 

MSWK 6805 Integrative Seminar (3 hours) 

Electives (3 hours) 

Total Hours Required for Master of Social Work - 60 hours 



54 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN URBAN STUDIES 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The Master of Science in Urban Studies (MSUS) is an interdisciplinary, collaborative 
graduate program between the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) at 
Savannah State University (SSU) and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University (AASU). The principal objectives of the program include the 
development of analytical research skills and the utilization of the intellectual resources 
necessary for the generation of new knowledge of urban areas in Georgia and worldwide; 
and to add to the general public's awareness of the problems and strengths of Georgia's 
urban areas through community activity. 

Suggested Course of Study for Master of Science Urban Studies (Full-Time Graduate 
Student) 

1st Semester - 1st Year 

Research Methods (3-0-3) 

American Urbanization (3-0-3) 

Systems and Processes of Policy Development (3-0-3) 

2nd Semester - 1st Year 

Statistical Methods for Urban Analysis (3-0-3) 

Introduction to Planning (3-0-3) 

Computer Applications for Urban Information Systems (3-0-3) 

1st Semester - 2nd Year 

Public Finance and Economics (3-0-3) 
Electives (2 courses) 6-0-6) 

2nd Semester - 2nd Year 

Electives (1 course) (3-0-3) 

Field paper or Master's Thesis (6-0-6) 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MSUS STUDENTS 

Students have the option of completing a field research paper or a master's thesis. A stu- 
dent should make the decision concerning the track they wish to pursue after completing 
all required courses in the MSUS program. A student may change their track with the 
permission of their advisor and the program coordinator. Completion of the field research 
track consists of the identification of a current issue in urban studies and the completion 
of a paper that directly addresses the issue. The master's thesis track consists of com- 
pleting an original research project under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Unless the 
student has received special permission, no student will be allowed to receive credit for the 
internship paper or master's thesis without completing their required courses and at least 
two elective courses. All students must select either a Field Research or Thesis advisor 
with approval by the program faculty and the program coordinator. The principal advisor 
must serve as a faculty member for the MSUS program. The program reserves the right 
to select an advisor if the student is unable to make a decision within a required time pe- 
riod. Students who opt for the thesis are responsible for selecting a principal advisor from 
among the faculty teaching within the program. 

Master's Thesis (Option A) 

The master's thesis consists of the completion of an original research project under the 
direct supervision of an advisor chosen by the student with the approval of the program 



55 



coordinator. In order to receive 6 hours credit for the master thesis, students who enroll 
in the thesis track must complete and defend a master-level thesis paper. Thesis students 
will enroll for the thesis credit and meet with their thesis advisor on a regular basis. They 
will also be required to participate in an oral defense of the thesis. The master thesis must 
be defended before a committee of three persons, two of whom must be faculty members as- 
sociated with the MSUS program. A third person may be chosen as a committee member 
who meets one of the following criteria: (1) the committee member must possess the ter- 
minal degree in their field of study or (2) has other expertise in the area of urban studies. 
The program faculty reserve the right of approval on all committee members. 

Field Research (Option B) 

The field research option consists of identifying a contemporary topic influencing the field 
of Urban Studies and producing an applied research paper. The topic must be placed 
within an academic context and consist of an original project design, policy analysis, evalu- 
ation or another project with approval from the student's advisor. The research must 
demonstrate the student's ability to apply the basic theories of urban studies and research 
methodology to the appropriate topic. Admittance into the field research class is depen- 
dent upon the prior selection of an advisor and approval of the proposed topic. The final 
paper must be defended before a committee of three faculty members, one of whom may 
be from another academic department, or otherwise considered an expert in the field of 
Urban Studies. The committee members must possess the terminal degree in their field 
of study or have other expertise in the area of urban studies. The program faculty reserve 
the right of approval on all committee members. The defense of the field research paper 
will consist of defending the paper's subject matter along with assessing the student's 
grasp of other relevant information about the field of Urban Studies. 

ADMISSIONS 

Applications are reviewed by an Admissions Committee which scores each application. 
Scores are based on both qualitative and quantitative assessments of a student's ability 
to succeed in graduate school. Assessments of the student's ability are based on scores re- 
ceived for 1) the GRE and previous GPAs, 2) analytical and writing abilities demonstrated 
through the writing sample, 3) overall abilities as determined through the letters of rec- 
ommendation. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to interview all candidates 
for admission. All applicants will be evaluated within the context of a completed portfolio 
based on a combination of the following quantitative and qualitative criteria: 

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 

• Official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate schools attended 

• Minimum GPA of 2.60 on a 4.0 scale (or its equivalent if degree is from a for- 
eign institution) 

• Submission of current scores on the GRE or any other standardized graduate 
examination 

• At least 3 letters of recommendation (if applying for admission as an in-service 
student-one letter must be from a co-worker with an equal or above rank or 
from a supervisor) letters should reference the applicant's ability to complete 
graduate school, supervisors should discuss how current work or experience 
will enhance the applicant's ability to complete graduate school, or contribute 
to the organization. Admission will not be decided based on the applicant's abil- 
ity to contribute to the organization, but their ability to contribute to the field 
of urban studies. 



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• Current resume (highlight any relevant work experience) 

• A one thousand word essay on one of the following: 

• A current problem facing urban America 

• Purpose for attending graduate school for urban studies degree 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Students are permitted to transfer 9 credit hours from another graduate institution, pro- 
vided the transferred courses are equivalent to a MSUS course offered at Savannah State 
University. 

PROBATIONARY STATUS 

Any student enrolled in the MSUS program whose overall grade point average falls below 
3.0 in any semester will be considered to be in probationary status. MSUS students that 
are in a probationary status are advised to not enroll the semester following their proba- 
tionary status. However, after one semester of absence students are permitted to request 
re-admission into the MSUS program. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Core Curriculum (27 hours) 

MSUS 8800 Global Urbanization (3 hours) 

MSUS 8810 History of American Urbanization (3 hours) 

MSUS 8820 Methods of Urban Research (3 hours) 

MSUS 8830 Introduction to Planning (3 hours) 

MSUS 8840 Computer Applications for Urban Information Systems (3 hours) 

MSUS 8850 Urban Fiscal and Policy Analysis (3 hours) 

MSUS 8870 Internship I (Pre-Service) (3 hours) 

MSUS 8875 Internship II (In-Service) (3 hours) 

MSUS 8880 Master Thesis (6 hours) 

Urban Concentration 

Students may choose up to four courses from and within the following concentration areas 
for a total of 9-12 elective hours. 

Urban Politics Concentration (9-12 hours) 

MSUS 8801 Classics of Urban Politics (3 hours) 

MSUS 8803 State and Local Government (3 hours) 

MSUS 8804 Public Budgeting and Finance (3 hours) 

MSUS 8806 Minority Group Politics (3 hours) 

MSUS 8807 Historic Preservation (3 hours) 

MSUS 8808 Politics of Poverty (3 hours) 

MSUS 8809 Policy Advocacy and Empowerment (3 hours) 

Urban and Regional Economic Development Concentration (9-12 hours) 

MSUS 8851 Seminar in Urban and Regional Planning (3 hours) 

MSUS 8852 Urban Geography (3 hours) 

MSUS 8854 Housing and Community Development (3 hours) 

MSUS 8855 Population Growth and Residential Development (3 hours) 

MSUS 8856 Transportation and Urban Development (3 hours) 

MSUS 8857 Environmental Issues and Waste Disposal (3 hours) 



57 



Public Management Concentration (9-12 hours) 

MSUS 8861 History, Scope and Practice of Public Administration (3 hours) 

MSUS 8862 Organizational Theory (3 hours) 

MSUS 8863 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 hours) 

MSUS 8864 Introduction to Public Policy (3 hours) 

MSUS 8865 Urban Policy and Administration (3 hours) 

MSUS 8866 African-American Administrators in Urban Bureaucracy and Public Policy 

(3 hours) 
MSUS 8867 Conflict Resolution (3 hours) 

Administration of Justice Concentration 
(Offered by Armstrong Atlantic State University) (9-12 hours) 

MSUS 8883 Drug, Alcohol, and Crime (3 hours) 
MSUS 8885 Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours) 

MSUS 8890 Pro- Seminar in Ethics and Criminal Justice ( 3 hours) 
MSUS 8891 Law Enforcement Problems and Practices (3 hours) 
MSUS 8892 Seminar in Juvenile Justice Administration (3 hours) 
MSUS 8894 Institutional Incarceration and Treatment (3 hours) 
MSUS 8895 Community Treatment and Services (3 hours) 
MSUS 8896 Seminar in Law and Social Control (3 hours) 
MSUS 8897 Topics in Law and Courts (3 hours) 

Total Hours Required for Master of Science in Urban Studies-36 hours 




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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARINE SCIENCES 

Note: Unless otherwise noted, lecture courses meet three hours each week and carry three 
semester hours credit. Laboratory courses meet four hours each week and carry one se- 
mester hour credit. 

MSCI 5201 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

Graduate level survey of the major disciplines of marine science including physics, geol- 
ogy, chemistry and biology. Emphasis will be placed on global scale processes including 
forces driving major ocean currents, tectonic activity, equilibrium chemistry, chemical and 
biological processes involved in nutrient cycling, and the determinants and effects of global 
climate change on major ocean processes. Prerequisite: physics, chemistry or biology. 

MSCI 5202 Introduction to Coastal Oceanography (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

Course will consist of a variety of lectures, labs, and field experiences related to coastal 
oceanographic processes. Topics will include coastal physical oceanography (tides, wind 
driven currents, estuarine processes and stratification), coastal geology (depositional and 
erosion in coastal and offshore regions), biology, and biogeochemical cycling in the coastal 
zone (benthic and water column processes). Prerequisite: MSCI 5201 

MSCI 5401 Technical Writing and Communication (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Explores the elements of communicating scientific and technical information. It provides 
an overview of communication design, audiences, formats, style, mechanics, graphics, lit- 
erature search, manuscript preparation, and seminar presentation. 

MSCI 5402 Research/Marine Science Seminar (1-0-1) 1 Credit 

Participation in preparation, presentation and discussion of marine-related seminar topics. 

MSCI 5560 Advanced Environmetrics (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

A statistics course that reviews linear statistical methods and teaches nonparametric ap- 
proaches to treat environmental/biological data. May include but not be limited to: power 
tests, randomization and experimental design, analyses of variance, covariance and devi- 
ance, simple to polynomial regression, non-parametric tests of significance, pairwise and 
multiple comparisons, and response surfaces. Prerequisite: statistics. 

MSCI 6310 Scientific Ethics (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

The basics in philosophical and ethical thought in science, expanded to include the faculty/ 
student relationship, peer review, data treatment, analysis and interpretation of data, 
funding sources and competition, proprietary research, politics of science in America and 
abroad (what factors shape funding emphases, how research foci vary regionally and glob- 
ally). 

MSCI 6323 Coastal Law and Policy (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

An exploration of common federal and state law principles and legislation affecting uses 
of the lands, waters, and natural resources of the coastline and the adjacent ocean waters. 
Topics studied include doctrines defining public and private property rights in the shore- 
line and submerged lands, coastal wetlands protection, beach management, marine fisher- 
ies, aquaculture regulation, marine protected species in coastal areas, pollution control, 
energy and mineral development, food sources, marine transportation and coastal land 
use control. 

MSCI 6324 Coastal Zone Management (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

All coastal states now cooperate with the U.S. Government in managing the coastal zone 
to maximize human and natural value. The laws, regulations, policies, public goals, and 
agencies involved in this effort will be described and evaluated for effectiveness. 



59 



MSCI 6542 Fisheries Population Dynamics (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Formulation and use of mathematical models used in stock assessment of commercial and 
recreational fisheries. Includes stock concept, estimation of growth, mortality rates, gear 
selectivity, estimating CPUE, maximum sustainable yield, stock/recruitment relation- 
ships, analytical and holistic models, data requirements and start to finish methods for 
fisheries stock assessment reports. Microcomputer modeling and analysis packages will be 
used. Prerequisite: calculus. 

MSCI 6546 Mariculture (2-0-2) 2 Credits 

Introduction to the principles and practice of the culture of marine organisms. Includes 
site selection, water quality, production systems, feeds and nutrition, health, broodstock 
management and husbandry, and economics, overview of finfish, molluscan, and crusta- 
cean, and aquatic plant culture, physiology of growth and reproduction including exposure 
to advanced technology (e.g. molecular methods, neuroendocrinology). Prerequisites: biol- 
ogy, MSCI 5201. 

MSCI 6550 Analytical Techniques in Seawater, Sediments and Soils (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Students will obtain competency in a variety of analytical techniques for the analysis of 
seawater, marine sediments, and soils. Nutrient analysis, chemical constituents, contami- 
nant analysis including both organic and inorganic contaminants, and bacteriological wa- 
ter quality. Prerequisite: chemistry. 

MSCI 6552 Marine Biotechnology (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

An overview of concepts, approaches, techniques, and applications of biotechnology with 
emphasis on marine biotechnology. Principles of recombinant DNA technology, its rel- 
evance to genetic engineering, and its uses in basic and applied biology. Methodology and 
concepts of genetic engineering technology; molecular mechanisms of gene transfer, inte- 
gration and expression of transgenes in target tissues/organisms. Applications of marine 
biotechnology in aquaculture, marine environmental protection, the use of transgenic fish, 
production of fuels from algae and natural products of pharmaceutical value from marine 
organisms, and other applications. Prerequisite: genetics. 

MSCI 6562 Remote Sensing (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Principles, characteristics and applications of environmental remote sensing. Topics in- 
clude concepts and foundations of remote sensing photographic systems and interpretation 
of thermal and multispectral scanning radar systems, satellite remote sensing and digital 
image processing. Aspects of oceanographic data such as phytoplankton abundance, sea- 
surface temperatures, ocean wind speeds and instrumentation such as SeaWiFS, AVHRR, 
and SSM/I will be emphasized. Prerequisites: calculus, statistics. 

MSCI 6725 Coastal Wetland Ecology (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Introduction to coastal wetlands (brackish/fresh water marshes, swamps, and bogs), with 
an emphasis on typical southeast US flora and fauna. Wetland physical diagnostic char- 
acteristics (hydrology, pedology) as well as biological parameters (primary productivity, 
biogeochemistry and nutrient transport) will be covered. 

MSCI 6726 Coastal Botany (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

Identification, classification, ecology of coastal plants and algae; wetland and barrier is- 
land plant communities and functions; physiological ecology of coastal plants and algae. 
Prerequisite: botany or ecology. 

MSCI 6745 Aquatic Pathology (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

Systematics, life history, spread, etiology, diagnoses and treatment of selected diseases 
among shellfish, fish, and marine mammals. Viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoan and inver- 
tebrate pathogens. The importance of aquatic diseases in aquaculture and to public health. 
Prerequisite: biology. 



60 



MSCI 6747 Marine Mammology (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Natural history, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology, conservation, and economic im- 
portance of the cetacea, pinnipedia, and sirenia. Prerequisite: biology. 

MSCI 6781 Benthic Ecology (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Ecology course describing the general chemical, biological and physical nature of the sedi- 
ment environment, comparing these traits across saltmarsh, deep sea and shelf habitats. 
Including trophic relationships and distribution of organisms, the role of microbial com- 
munities, formation of detritus, and sediment transport. 

MSCI 7344 Fisheries Management (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Environmental ecology, conservation, and processes used to manage living marine and 
aquatic resources harvested or otherwise impacted by human activities. Examples from 
global, regional, and local areas will be highlighted. 

MSCI 7527 Coastal Environmental Certifications (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Provides background, basis in law, descriptions, and requirements for a variety of certifica- 
tions and training associated with environmental regulation compliance in coastal areas. 

MSCI 7564 Geographic Information Systems and Database Management 

in Coastal Studies (3-1-4) 4 Credits 

Theory, concepts, limitations, and implementation of geographical spatial analysis sys- 
tems for the study of coastal processes. Through a "hands-on" approach, students will be- 
come familiar with the use of GIS and other information management systems for analysis 
of complex large databases pertaining to coastal processes. 

MSCI 7728 Coastal Processes (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Changes in the very dynamic coastal environment are best understood by evaluating the 
major physical processes that control coastal configuration, including tides and currents, 
storm impacts, sea level change, sediment transport, barrier island and delta formation, 
and river input. In addition, organism impacts on the coastal environment will also be 
evaluated (marsh vegetation, dune vegetation, human alterations, and estuarine nurser- 
ies). Prerequisites: MSCI 5201, MSCI 5202. 

MSCI 7743 Fisheries Oceanography (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Introduction to the physical and biological processes (i.e., recruitment variability, com- 
pensatory mechanisms, and species interactions) that control the abundance of living 
marine resource populations. Includes case studies of contemporary multidisciplinary re- 
search. 

MSCI 7754 Marine Biogeochemistry (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Chemistry course, which focuses on the sources, transport and fate of organic, matter in 
natural environments including marine sediments, soils and natural waters. Includes the 
global carbon cycle, analytical methods in organic geochemistry, geochemistry of organic 
matter constituents, and geochemistry of humic substances. Prerequisite: MSCI 5202. 

MSCI 7782 Marine Microbial Ecology (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Emphasizes the diversity and role of microorganisms in marine ecosystems. Nutrient 
cycles, methods of microbial analysis, genetic diversity, and the functional roles of micro- 
organisms in marine systems. 

MSCI 7783 Water Column Ecology (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Major biological processes in the water column of estuarine, coastal, and open sea en- 
vironments, with emphasis on interactions of biota with marine chemical and physical 
processes. 



61 



MSCI 7801 Directed Research (0-(l-3)-(l-3)) 3 Credits 

Directed readings or research at the graduate level to meet the needs of individual stu- 
dents. Consent of instructor required. Variable credit. 

MSCI 7851 Special Topics ((l-3)-0-(l-3)) 3 Credits 

Content to be determined each semester. May be repeated. Variable credit. 

MSCI 7991 Thesis I (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Thesis research and preparation. Consent of research advisor required. 

MSCI 7992 Thesis II (3-0-3) 3 Credits 

Thesis research and preparation. Consent of research advisor required. 

MSCI 6000 Special Topics: 

Special topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course will 
be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and labo- 
ratories (if offered). 

If a given special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, it will be submitted 
for formal approval through regular university procedures. A course outline and syllabus 
will be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to scheduling of course. 

MSCI 6100 Independent Study: 

Independent study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. 

An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and the department 
chairperson prior to a student's enrollment in the course. A statement regarding the con- 
ditions and credit/semester limits under which the course may be repeated must be clearly 
stated in the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

PADM 6829 American National Government 3 Credits 

An examination of the governing process in the United States of America. The focus is 
the federal system, constitutional checks and balances, and problems arising out of the 
processes of conflict and conflict resolution primarily at the national level between the 
president, Congress, the federal bureaucracy, political parties, and interest groups. (If this 
course is taken to meet the prerequisite for a course in American National government, it 
will not count towards the 36 hours for the degree.) 

PADM 6830 History, Scope, and Practice of Public Administration 3 Credits 

An examination of the study and practice of public administration in the United States. 
It provides a historical account of the evolution and development of the field of public ad- 
ministration as a discipline and a profession. Cross-listed as MSUS 8861. (Required of all 
degree candidates in their first semester of course work.) 

PADM 6831 Ethics for Public Administrator 3 Credits 

An exploration of the legal, political, professional, and organizational accountability de- 
mands made on administrators and their relationship to ethical decision- making and ethi- 
cal integrity. The emphasis is on the requirements for ethical behavior and accountability 
in a democratic society. 



62 



PADM 6832 Organizational Theory 3 Credits 

A study of formal structure, internal workings, and external environment of complex hu- 
man behavior within organizations. Surveys classical to contemporary theories of human 
organization. Emphasis is on the impact of formal and informal structures and processes 
on the performance of public organizations. 

PADM 6833 Management of Human Resources 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the organization, techniques, and theories of personnel man- 
agement. The emphasis is on human resource management and its role as a force in ad- 
dressing the issues of social responsibility and economic equity. Topics include changing 
composition of the public service work force, affirmative action, comparable worth, position 
qualification, education and training needs, unions, collective bargaining, and rights of 
public employees. 

PADM 6834 Public Budgeting and Finance 3 Credits 

A systematic and comprehensive exploration of the theory and practice of public budget- 
ing and finance in state and local governments. It examines how federal, state and local 
governments get and spend money. Students develop skills in preparing, managing, and 
analyzing capital and operating budgets, and using analytical techniques that aid budget- 
ary decision- making. Cross-listed as MSUS 8862 and MSWK 6834 

PADM 6835 Local Government Administration 3 Credits 

An examination of local governmental structures, forms, functions, revenue sources, and 
economic development issues and alternatives available to encourage more effective ad- 
ministration to meet public and private demand. Emphasis is on resource constraints and 
fiscal limitations. 
Prerequisite: PADM 6829 or undergraduate equivalent 

PADM 6836 State Government Administration 3 Credits 

An examination of state government structures, functions, revenue sources, economic de- 
velopment issues, and alternatives available to encourage more effective administration to 
meet public and private demands. Topics include the place and role of state governments 
within the federal system and their limitations in the procurements, development, and al- 
location of resources to meet public demands. Prerequisite: PADM 6829 or undergraduate 
equivalent. Cross-listed as MSUS 8803 

PADM 6837 Intergovernmental Relations 3 Credits 

An examination of the interaction of federal, state, and local political systems in the de- 
velopment of public policy. Focus is on the reciprocal influences of local, state, and fed- 
eral bureaucracies, the grant-in-aid system, revenue sharing, and federal, state, and local 
policy-making. Roles and responsibilities of federal, state, regional, and local systems are 
examined from the theoretical and practical perspectives. The course is oriented to urban 
governments and their interactions with other levels of government. Prerequisite: PADM 
6829 or undergraduate equivalent 

PADM 6838 Introduction to Public Policy 3 Credits 

An introduction to the study of public policy, including theories of public policy and public 
choice theory. Focus is on understanding the public policy process at national, state, and 
local governmental levels. Cross-listed as MSUS 8864 

PADM 6839 Statistical Applications in Public Administration 3 Credits 

A practical discourse emphasizing the use of statistics, computers, and software applica- 
tions in applied research problems in public administration. A primary goal of this course 
is the development of basic statistical competency, utilizing problems and cases pertinent 



63 



to public administrators. The statistical basis of hypothesis testing is covered using both 
descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distribution, central tendency, 
variability, nonparametric and contingency analysis, multivariate analysis and correla- 
tion, analysis of variance, probability, and regression. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course 
in statistics. 

PADM 6840 Research Methods 3 Credits 

A systematic treatment of research as a practical skill for policy analysis, needs assess- 
ment, and program evaluation. Emphasis is placed on data sources and data gathering, 
research models, and research design. This course explores the concepts of measurement, 
questionnaire design, sampling, hypothesis formulation, coding, quantification of data, 
conceptual and operational definitions, computer-aided data analysis using statistical 
packages, and report writing. Students must design and conduct a major research project 
using the skills acquired. 

PADM 6843 Management and Leadership Behavior 3 Credits 

An in-depth focus on skills, knowledge, and abilities of the manager or leader in the public 
organization. Emphasis is on written, oral, and listening communication skills, conflict 
resolution, and management of organizational resources. Prerequisite: PADM 6830 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

PADM 6844 Seminar in Public Policy Analysis 3 Credits 

An examination of selected public policies and the effects on urban governments using 
models, theories, approaches, and techniques to analyze public policies. Emphasis is on 
the policy dimensions of urban systems and their relationship to the social, political, and 
economic context. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permission of the instructor 

PADM 6845 Urban Policy and Administration 3 Credits 

An in-depth probe of the administrative, political, and organizational issues of metropoli- 
tan governments. It examines various forms of metropolitan governments, the impact of 
structure on administration and policy, and major issues of metropolitan governments in 
the federal system. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permission of the instructor 

PADM 6846 Administrative Law 3 Credits 

An examination of the place of law in the formation, articulation, and enforcement of pub- 
lic policy. Emphasis is on the study of the legislative, judicial, and general policy-making 
powers of administrative agencies and regulatory commissions, including the procedures 
for judicial review and administrative action. 

PADM 6847 Seminar in Constitutional Law 3 Credits 

Seminar examines the evolution of federal and state constitutional law and the relation- 
ship to public agencies. 

PADM 6848 Contemporary Issues in Public Administration 3 Credits 

Focuses on current issues in public administration and examines the historical and future 
implications of these issues. Skills are developed in information searches, maintaining 
currency in the literature of the field and professional areas, and identifying state-of-the 
art programs and approaches to administrative issues. 

PADM 6850 Computer Applications in Public Administration 3 Credits 

An introduction to the use of selected software to examine problems in public administra- 
tion and public policy, with an emphasis on data bases, spreadsheets, and statistical and 
desktop publishing programs for microcomputers. In this course, students acquire compe- 
tency in managing information as an organizational resource. 



64 



PADM 6851 Social Welfare Policy, Planning, and Administration 3 Credits 

A comprehensive survey and analysis of the historical and contemporary issues of social 
welfare policy-making in the United States and the role of federal, state, and local gov- 
ernments and nonprofit agencies in formulating, funding, and administering social pro- 
grams. 

PADM 6852 Criminal Justice Administration 3 Credits 

Course surveys the philosophical, legal, sociological, and political aspects of criminal jus- 
tice administration at the state and local levels. Emphasizes the role of the federal, state, 
and local governments in formulating, implementing, and evaluating criminal justice sys- 
tems. 

PADM 6853 Public Service Internship (Pre-service) 5 Credits 

An educational experience requiring students to complete a 300-hour field internship and 
a major internship paper for which students receive 5 semester credit hours. This course 
is designed to supplement and reinforce classroom experience by providing students with 
opportunities to work as participant-observers in governmental and nonprofit agencies. 

PADM 6854 Public Service Internship (In-service) 2 Credits 

Students designated as in-service will enroll in this course while completing their major 
internship paper. They are exempt from the 300-hour work requirement. 

PADM 6855 Special Topics in Public Administration 3 Credits 

Topical study of current approaches and issues in public management, including conflict 
resolution, problem solving, information management, benchmarking, and other emerging 
innovations in the field and practice of public administration practice. 

PADM 6856 Comparative Public Administration 3 Credits 

Examines comparative approaches to the practice of public administration in the Western 
and Non- Western world. Public bureaucracies and public policies demonstrate the impact 
of diverse cultural, historical, legal, and political contexts. 

PADM 6857 Directed Readings and Research 3 Credits 

A supervised reading course in selected fields within public administration. Limited to 
materials not being covered in a course offered during the same semester. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor 

PADM 6858 Seminar in Cultural Diversity 3 Credits 

An exploration of the historical and legal foundations for equal opportunity in employ- 
ment in the public sector an examines the role of cultural difference in the organization. 
Focus is on managing the diverse work force. Prerequisite: PADM 6833 or permission of 
the instructor 

PADM 6859 Legislative Behavior 3 Credits 

Focuses on the legislative bodies in the American federal system and their interactions 
with the executive and judicial branches. This course also examines the impact of legisla- 
tive units on public administrators and the conduct of their work. 

PADM 6860 African-American Administrators in Urban Bureaucracy 

and Public Policy 3 Credits 

An exploratory course that looks at the contributions and issues facing African-American 
public administrators in historical and contemporary contexts. Special emphasis is on ad- 
ministrative behavior and style, value orientations, and role expectations, conflicts, and 
demands. Cross-listed as MSUS 8866 



65 



PADM 6861 Public Program Evaluation 3 Credits 

An examination of theory and methods of public program evaluation and the politics of 
program evaluation. Focus is on acquisition of skills in conducting program evaluation, 
including research design, selecting social indicators, conducting the study, and report 
writing. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permission of the instructor 

PADM 6862 Public Policy Implementation 3 Credits 

An examination of the way public administrators manage substantive public policy issues, 
such as housing, social welfare, and education. The focus is on the organizational factors 
and political issues affecting policy implementation. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permis- 
sion of the instructor 

PADM 6863 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 Credits 

An examination of different concepts regarding collective bargaining in the public sector. 
It includes the historical context of labor relations, collective bargaining process, analysis 
of issues such as public employee strikes, mediation, fact finding, and arbitration, as well 
as state and local government employee unionization. Prerequisite: PADM 6833 (only for 
students selecting the Human Resource concentration) 

PADM 6864 Public Policy Formation 3 Credits 

An examination of how public policy is formulated at various levels of government in the 
United States. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permission of the instructor 

PADM 6865 Special Topics in Public Policy 3 Credits 

A focus on selected topics in substantive policy issues. 

PADM 6869 Decision Sciences 3 Credits 

An introduction to the application of decision- making technologies such as, decision mak- 
ing software (DMS), geographical information systems and software (GIS), and general 
decision support systems (DSS), to the public sector. 

PADM 6870 Rights and Basic Needs of Public Sector Employees 3 Credits 

An in-depth analysis of the rights and needs of government employees, including politi- 
cal participation, employment, and privacy on the job. Focus is also on the off-duty rights 
of public employees concerning issues of drug testing or sexual behavior. Prerequisite: 
PADM 6833 (for students selecting the Human Resource concentration) 

PADM 6871 Organization Behavior 3 Credits 

A study of individual behavior, interpersonal relations, group interactions, and the inter- 
play of human and nonhuman factors. Focus is on the application of theoretical concepts 
to the practice of public organizations. Cross-listed with MSUS 8862 

PADM 6872 Human Resource Training and Development 3 Credits 

Seminar prepares students to assess training and development problems in public and 
non-profit agencies and prescribe appropriate interventions, including training, discipline, 
job redesign, and new reward systems. Prerequisite: PADM 6833 or permission of the 
instructor. 

PADM 6873 Strategic Planning and Public Administrators 3 Credits 

A course introducing theories and approaches to long term and short term planning. 
Focuses on integration of strategic planning into core functions of organizations in the 
public and non-profit sectors. 

PADM 6874 Fast Track Internship Experience 1 Credit 

Students in the Fast Track program will enroll in the internship experience in the semes- 
ter following receipt of the bachelor's degree. Students will complete a minimum of 150 
hours in an approved internship. 



66 



PADM 6875 Comprehensive Examination Seminar 1 Credit 

Students will enroll in this course in the semester they plan to take the oral comprehensive 
examination. Prerequisite: Completion of all core courses and the internship paper 



HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION 

HSCA 7620 Health Care Administration 3 Credits 

An analysis of current and prospective issues in health administration. The course in- 
cludes the use of models and simulations for decision-making and control in health ad- 
ministration. 

HSCA 7665 Health Care Strategic Marketing and Planning 3 Credits 

An in-depth study of the selling of health using education techniques from the point of 
view of social scientists and business and health professionals. The utilization of concepts 
of health into lifestyle is addressed, using the human development model. 

HSCA 8630 Health Care Financial Management 3 Credits 

An overview of management and policy concepts and issues pertaining to health care fa- 
cilities, personnel, and programs. 

HSCA 8615 Legal and Ethical Environments of Health Care 3 Credits 

A study of the legal basis and ethical dimensions of health care decision-making. The 
course is designed to give students a philosophical underpinning to discussions of specific 
legal and ethical topics in health care. 

HSCP 8700 Public Health Planning and Evaluation 3 Credits 

A study of the planning and evaluation of health programs in a variety of settings. 
**This concentration is offered in collaboration with Armstrong Atlantic State University 
Master of Health Services Administration degree program. 

PADM 6000 Special Topics: 

Special topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course will 
be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and labo- 
ratories (if offered). If a given special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, 
it will be submitted for formal approval through regular university procedures. A course 
outline and syllabus will be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to 
scheduling of course. 

PADM 6100 Independent Study: 

Independent study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and 
the department chairperson prior to a student's enrollment in the course. A statement re- 
garding the conditions and credit/semester limits under which the course may be repeated 
must be clearly stated in the description (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 



67 



MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

SOWK 5501 Law, Race and Poverty in the Welfare of Children 3 Credits 

A required course for first year Title IV- E Child Welfare recipients. The course focuses on 

child abuse and neglect, separation and loss, foster care, kinship care, the courts and legal 

issues related to decision-making. Emphasis is placed upon the differential application of 

the law and the interventions of human service workers. 

Prerequisites: Admission to MSW Program and Current Title IV-E Child Welfare 

Recipient 

MSWK 6650 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 Credits 

An examination of normal human development through the life cycle using biological, 
psychological, sociological, and cultural perspectives. The systems perspective and the eco- 
logical model are used to guide this course. 

MSWK 6651 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 Credits 

An examination of human behavior as it relates to macro systems. Communities and or- 
ganizations are considered from the social systems perspectives. Organizational cultures, 
policies and procedures, reward systems, and goals of operation are studied. 
Prerequisite: MSWK 6650 

MSWK 6652 Diversity Issues and Social Work Practice 3 Credits 

This course utilizes an Afrocentric paradigm and strengths perspective to develop and /or 
enhance self-awareness and sensitivity for culturally competent social work practice with 
individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. It examines diversity in a 
global environment (local, national, international, rural and urban) and explores various 
forms of oppression and social and economic injustice due to class, religion, age, gender, 
race, ethnicity, national origin, culture, physical and/or mental ability, gays, lesbians, bi- 
sexual, and transgendered populations. Prerequisites: MSWK 6650 & MSWK 6680 

MSWK 6660 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families 3 Credits 

The foundation practice course. The course focuses on the fundamentals of intervention at 
the micro level and the skills needed for generalist practice. 

MSWK 6661 Social Work Practice with Groups, Communities, 

and Organizations 3 Credits 

A course focusing on the development of the knowledge, values, and interventive skills 
related to problems of larger client systems, families, groups, communities, and organiza- 
tional structures. 
Prerequisite: MSWK 6660 

MSWK 6670 Research Methods I 3 Credits 

An examination of research methods in social work and their relevance for social work 
practice. Emphasis is on research as a scientific process and its utility in policy develop- 
ment and in evaluation of social work practice and social service delivery systems. 

MSWK 6672 Drug and Alcohol Abuse and Social Work Practice 3 Credits 

This course will familiarize students with the history and pharmacology of alcohol and 
other drugs (AOD); the etiology of AOD abuse and dependence; approaches to assessment 
and treatment of AOD abuse and dependence; the importance or relevant social systems 
(e.g., family, work, community/society) and spirituality in addition and recovery; and the 
role of the social worker in a multi-disciplinary approach to AOD abuse prevention and 
treatment. The emphasis in the course will be on the etiology and treatment of AOD abuse 
and dependence with the poor, the oppressed, racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities, and 
other at-risk urban populations. 
Prerequisites: MSWK 6650 & MSWK 6651 



68 



MSWK 6680 Social Welfare Policy and Services 3 Credits 

A foundation course which introduces students to current policies, programs, and delivery 
systems and their impact on contemporary social problems and conflicting issues. The his- 
torical development of social welfare in the United States is studied and the concept of the 
welfare state is introduced. Concepts intrinsic to social welfare policy are introduced. 

MSWK 6690 Generalist Field Practicum I 4 Credits 

Placement in an approved human service setting 20 hours per week for a total of 300 clock 
hours. This course is required of all students completing the foundation year courses. This 
practicum is based on generic foundation content and is oriented toward generalist social 
work practice. 

MSWK 6750 Clinical Practice I 3 Credits 

This is the first course in a two-course sequence of Advanced Clinical Practice. Students 
in this course will integrate core counseling skills and generalist social work practice per- 
spective gained in MSWK 6660 into a personal treatment philosophy from an ecosystemic 
perspective using social work theoretical approaches to individuals, families, and groups. 
Another major thrust for the course will be to integrate the eclectic knowledge base of 
MSWK 6660 on a group, community, and an organizational level into social work treat- 
ment models and theories (e.g., Ethnic-Sensitive/Multidimensional Practice Model; Task- 
Centered, Life Model of Practice). This is a "how to" hands on course with the primary 
objective of learning how to integrate theory into practice on a micro, mezzo, and macro 
level. 

MSWK 6751 Clinical Practice II 3 Credits 

This is a second course in the two-semester sequence of Advanced Clinical Practice. 
Students in this course will begin the process of integrating skills gained in MSWK 6660, 
MSWK 6661 and MSWK 6750 to develop a personal treatment philosophy from an eco- 
systemic perspective, using family-centered and community organization approaches. A 
major thrust for this course will be how to integrate the theoretical models of structural, 
solution-focused, strategic, and experiential treatment into practice. A community project 
will serve as a learning laboratory for the student. Prerequisite: MSWK 6650 

MSWK 6752 Crisis Intervention and Brief Therapy 3 Credits 

This advance elective covers the history, development, and application of both crisis theory 
and brief solution-focused treatment within the context of the significance of biopsychoso- 
cial potential for healthy human development and social functioning. Emphasis is placed 
on practical application of techniques in situations such as natural disaster, death and 
dying, AIDS, battering, post-traumatic stress syndrome, rape, suicide, and family dysfunc- 
tion. 

MSWK 6760 Research Methods II 3 Credits 

The advanced application of social research methodology to the design, implementation, 
and evaluation of program and practice models in social work and social welfare. Students 
develop skills necessary to undertake advanced social work research and evaluation of 
practice skills and programs and contribute to increasing the knowledge base of the profes- 
sion. Prerequisite: MSWK 6670 

MSWK 6762 Mental Health Issues with Adults: Psychopathology 3 Credits 

This course reviews work with adults who are experiencing mental health issues. It em- 
ploys the use of DSM-IV-TR in strengths-based psychosocial assessment and treatment 
planning, diversity issues, the impact of managed care, influence of poverty and welfare 
reform, and ethical concerns in psychopathologies of adulthood: schizophrenia; mood dis- 
orders; anxiety, adjustment and dissociative disorders; substance-related disorders; per- 
sonality disorders with special attention to borderline, narcissistic, and antisocial person- 



69 



ality disorders; and health conditions impacting mental health including HIV/AIDS and 
dementia. Emphasized are criteria for differential diagnosis of these psychopathologies; 
major theories and research on etiology and dynamics of each and research on efficacy 
of different models. Implications for social work interventions, service provisions, and 
community supports with urban and rural populations are also considered. Particular 
attention is given to the impact of mental illness and its treatment from Afrocentric and 
Feminist perspectives. Attention is given to assessment and intervention with gay, lesbi- 
an, and transgendered clients. Prerequisites: MSWK 6650, MSWK 6651, & MSWK 6670 

MSWK 6780 Social Administration I 3 Credits 

A study of organizational theory as the basis of social administration. The course focuses 
on the knowledge and skills necessary for administration and management. Emphasis is 
placed on principles, concepts, and models of social welfare administration. 

MSWK 6781 Social Administration II 3 Credits 

This is a core course for the Administration concentration. It builds on MSWK 6780 Social 
Administration I course in advancing students' generalist knowledge and skills for work 
in organizations and communities. Historically, nonprofit organizations have been used 
as the avenue for obtaining social justice and equity for groups that have been victimized 
by discrimination and oppression (African Americans, gays and lesbians, the handicapped, 
and others). This course looks at the history of some of these organizations and the ways 
in which many of them were able to groom leaders who often became national and inter- 
national spokespersons for social justice. The course also focuses on selected frameworks 
for, and critical tasks involved with, managing community-based human service organiza- 
tions and/or programs in both urban and rural areas. The course is designed to develop 
specific managerial knowledge and skills that are useful in a fluid, fast-paced social service 
environment. 

MSWK 6782 Advanced Policy and Planning 3 Credits 

This course, the second in the policy sequence, builds upon policy analysis and history of 
social welfare. It focuses on the skill development for the practice of policy. Students are 
required to complete the phases of the policy-making process from agenda setting through 
policy evaluation while demonstrating analytical, political, value clarifying and interac- 
tional skills. Prerequisite: MSWK 6680 

MSWK 6790 Field Practicum II 4 Credits 

A practicum focusing on clinical social work with individuals, families, and groups or on 
social administration and the preparation of the student for responsible ethical practice 
as a social work administrator. Student must complete 350 clock hours in a field setting. 
Prerequisite: MSWK 6690 

MSWK 6791 Field Practicum III 4 Credits 

A continuation of MSWK 6790. This course is a practicum focusing on clinical social work 
with individuals, families, and groups or on social administration and the preparation for 
ethical practice as a social work administrator. Student must complete 350 clock hours in 
a field setting. Prerequisite: MSWK 6790 

MSWK 6805 Integrative Seminar 3 Credits 

An integrative seminar serving as the capstone course and designed to facilitate and in- 
sure the integration of social work methods and the application of these methods in vary- 
ing field of practice with appropriate under girding of social work values. A product of the 
teaching/learning milieu is a research project which serves as evidence that students are 
ready for autonomous practice. Prerequisite: MSWK 6750 or 6780 



70 



MSWK 6834 Public Budgeting and Finance 3 Credits 

A systematic and comprehensive exploration of the theory and practice of public finance in 
state and local governments. It examines how federal, state and local governments get and 
spend money. Students develop skills in preparing, managing, and analyzing capital and 
operating budgets, and using analytical techniques that aid budgetary decision-making. 
Cross-listed with PADM 6834 

MSWK 7340 Working with Difficult Children and Adolescents: 

Special Treatment Issues 3 Credits 

Elective course addresses the problems of treating children and adolescents with severe 
behavioral problems by presenting a family-based model that articulates how to engage 
the uncooperative child or adolescent in the treatment using age appropriate strategies. 
Required for second year MSW Title IV-E students. 

MSWK 6000 Special Topics 

Special topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course will 
be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and labo- 
ratories (if offered). If a given special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, 
it will be submitted for formal approval through regular university procedures. A course 
outline and syllabus will be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to 
scheduling of course. 

MSWK 6100 Independent Study 

Independent study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. 

An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and the department 
chairperson prior to a student's enrollment in the course. A statement regarding the con- 
ditions and credit/semester limits under which the course may be repeated must be clearly 
stated in the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 



Approved Master of Social Work Electives from Public Administration 

PADM 6833 Management of Human Resources 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the organization, techniques, and theories of personnel man- 
agement. The emphasis is on human resource management and its role as a force in ad- 
dressing the issues of social responsibility and economic equity. Topics include changing 
composition of the public service work force, affirmative action, comparable worth, position 
qualification, education and training needs, unions, collective bargaining, and rights of 
public employees. 

PADM 6843 Management and Leadership Behavior 3 Credits 

An in-depth focus on skills, knowledge, and abilities of the manager or leader in the public 
organization. Emphasis is on written, oral, and listening communication skills, conflict 
resolution, and management of organizational resources. Prerequisite: PADM 6830 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 



71 



PADM 6860 African-American Administrators in Urban Bureaucracy 

and Public Policy 3 Credits 

An exploratory course that looks at the contributions and issues facing African-American 
public administrators in historical and contemporary contexts. Special emphasis is on ad- 
ministrative behavior and style, value orientations, and role expectations, conflicts, and 
demands. Cross-listed as MSUS 8866 

PADM 6861 Public Program Evaluation 3 Credits 

An examination of theory and methods of public program evaluation and the politics of 
program evaluation. Focus is on acquisition of skills in conducting program evaluation, 
including research design, selecting social indicators, conducting the study, and report 
writing. Prerequisite: PADM 6838 or permission of the instructor 



MASTER OF URBAN STUDIES 

MSUS 8800 Global Urbanization 3 Credits 

Survey of economic, social, political and cultural aspects of global urban development since 
the 19th century. Emphasis on Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8801 Classics of Urban Politics 3 Credits 

Study of early research and theoretical formulations that formed the basis for the contem- 
porary study of the urban area Relevant works of Weber, Malthus, Marx, and other social 
theorists will be studied. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8803 State and Local Government 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with SSU PADM 6835 Local Government Administration or PADM 6836 
State Government Administration) Comparative study of states, communities, and local 
governments, and their management of political conflict. Special emphasis placed on the 
impacts to urban areas. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8804 Public Budgeting and Finance 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with SSU PADM 6834) Study of how governments raise and spend money. 
Primary focus will be given to budgeting practices and fiscal administration by local gov- 
ernments. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8806 Minority Group Politics 3 Credits 

A holistic exposition of the dynamics of minority groups within the American urban po- 
litical experience. The course will address the historical role played by minorities in the 
evolution of U.S. urban politics. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8807 Historic Preservation 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU PBHS 5830G Historic Preservation) Examination of the field 
including values, principles, practices, development of planning and organization for pres- 
ervation, preservation law, economics and politics. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8808 Politics of Poverty 3 Credits 

Study of the nature and extent of poverty with particular attention to political factors that 
influence public policies. Case studies of selected issues will be explored. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8809 Policy Advocacy and Empowerment 3 Credits 

Study of effective tactics and strategies emerging in urban social change. Collective grass- 
roots movements will be examined. (3-0-3) 



72 



MSUS 8810 History of American Urbanization 3 Credits 

Introduces causes, processes, and impacts of American urbanization from the colonial pe- 
riod to the present. Examines political, economic, social and cultural relations. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8820 Methods of Urban Research 3 Credits 

Introduces social research methods. Emphasis on statistics,, design, data collection, com- 
puter applications, measurement, and analysis with a macro focus. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate course in basic statistics. 

MSUS 8821 Statistical Methods for Urban Analysis 3 Credits 

Students will develop expertise in applying advanced statistical methods to contemporary 
urban problems. 

MSUS 8823 Urban Development Process 3 Credits 

This course is intended for graduate students with little or no background in the urban 
development process or market analysis of urban redevelopment projects. Topics to be cov- 
ered include data sources and economic base analysis, market area definition, site analy- 
sis, highest and best use, market demand, demand surveys, and forecasting, competitive 
supply, and data gathering. Student will strategically incorporate these topics into a final 
project that analyzes market niches and market penetration rates, lease rates, synergism, 
tenant mix, and go/no go decision on a specific site. 

MSUS 8824 Urban Development Finance 3 Credits 

This course offers students applied experience in identifying and developing sources of 
financing for urban development projects. 

MSUS 8830 Introduction to Planning 3 Credits 

Includes an applied research experience in community reconnaissance (community sur- 
veying) or program evaluation. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: MSUS 8820. 

MSUS 8830 Planning Law 3 Credits 

This course covers planning and land use law in the United States, focusing on the state, 
city, and regional levels. Case law will be presented and students will gain an understand- 
ing of administrative systems, legislation, and decisions by the judiciary that affect land 
use. 

MSUS 8840 Computer Applications for Urban Information Systems 3 Credits 

Introduces computer applications in urban and regional planning, including applications 
in geographical information systems (GIS), urban data base designs, digitizing procedures 
and computer graphics for measuring urban spatial organization. Includes defining eco- 
nomic regions, making population projections and employment forecasting. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8850 Urban Fiscal and Policy Analysis 3 Credits 

Provides a systematic study of the development, implementation, and evaluation of urban 
policies, with special emphasis on their fiscal impacts. Applies economic principles to the 
study of the role of government. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8851 Seminar in Urban and Regional Planning 3 Credits 

Includes a comprehensive analysis of the overall planning process and the use of master 
plans to guide the growth and development of cities and their surrounding regions; also, 
the role of planning in development, management and organization of metropolitan envi- 
ronments. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8852 Urban Geography 3 Credits 

Study the role geography plays in the structure and development of urban areas. Includes 
analysis of the rise, decline, and rebirth of cities, functional classification of cities, internal 
structure of urban areas, and theories of urban growth. (3-0-3) 



73 



MSUS 8854 Housing and Community Development 3 Credits 

Study of the methodology, techniques, and strategies utilized to assess housing conditions, 
housing supply and demand within urban communities. Examines strategic linkage be- 
tween community preservation and stability and housing development. Includes emphasis 
on the concepts of citizen participation, self- directive, social advocacy planning and self- 
help in community revitalization efforts and case studies of current approaches involving 
innovative solutions. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8855 Population Growth and Residential Development 3 Credits 

Examination of the link between population growth and residential development. 
Introduces techniques and procedures to quantify population trends and characteristics of 
residential growth and development. Includes practices of local, state and national govern- 
ments in forming policies designed to project and monitor population movement planning 
residential development strategies. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8856 Transportation and Urban Development 3 Credits 

Study of the role of public and private transportation in the development of the modern 
city. Emphasis on the impact transportation has on urban social structures. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8857 Environmental Issues and Waste Disposal 3 Credits 

Study of the specific problems of urban waste management and disposal. Addresses issues 
of source reduction, recycling, waste incineration, and land filling, as well as the social im- 
plications of the utilization of various energy sources and their associated waste disposal 
methods. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8860 Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Urban Development 3 Credits 

Examines the impact of race, ethnicity, and gender on the development of urban centers 
from sociological, socio-historical and socio-political perspectives. Focuses on the role of 
racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, oppression and economic exploitation on the plight of these 
groups. Emphasis on the consequences of the urbanization process on African- Americans 
in particular, other ethnic groups and women in general. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8861 History, Scope and Practice of Public Administration 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with PADM 6830) Study of the organization and operation of government 
agencies, their role in policy making and implementation, the various concepts and theo- 
ries pertaining to administrative behavior, and the performance of the basic tasks of man- 
agement. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8862 Organizational Theory 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with SSU PADM 6871) Examination of basic classical and contemporary 
theoretical approaches and issues in organizations. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8863 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU PSYC 5210G) A survey of applications of psychological principles 
in private and public sector organizations and agencies. Topics include goal setting, power 
politics, work motivation, leadership and supervision, and modes of organizational com- 
munications. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8864 Introduction to Public Policy 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with SSU PADM 6838) An investigation of the major forces that influence the 
formulation, implementation, and administration of public policy. Emphasis on political 
aspects of policy formulation and the mobilization of political support. Theoretical prin- 
ciples will be applied to specific urban problems. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8865 Urban Policy and Administration 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with SSU PADM 6845) Explores the administrative, political and organiza- 
tional issues of metropolitan governments, examines various forms of metropolitan gov- 
ernments, and the major challenges of these governments. (3-0-3) 



74 



MSUS 8866 African Administrators in Urban Bureaucracy and 

Public Policy 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with PADM 6860) Course focuses on the historic contributions and contempo- 
rary issues facing African-American urban public administrators. Emphasis is on admin- 
istrative behavior and style, value orientations, and role expectations. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8867 Conflict Resolution 3 Credits 

Course emphasizes the identification of the major causes of organizational and group con- 
flicts and their resolutions. Particular attention is given to identifying means to achieve 
harmony through organizational and group cultures, and manage conflict that arises from 
competing values. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8870 Internship I (Pre-Service) 3 credits 

Students are assigned work with an urban agency offering professional experience in re- 
lated career options. The student will work a minimum of twenty (20) hours per week 
under the joint supervision of the person designated by the agency and the faculty intern- 
ship coordinator. Assignment is designed to enhance the student's knowledge and skills. 
Students will complete a written project related to the work experience. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8874 Urban Design Seminar 3 Credits 

This course introduces basic concepts of urban design with a particular focus on historical 
precedents in American and international cities. Students will explore how zoning, historic 
preservation, transportation, and design guidelines play a role in urban design, and how 
to identify the actors that participate in the development process, and their roles and re- 
lationships to urban design. 

MSUS 8875 Internship II (In-Service) 3 Credits 

Advanced internship requiring proficiency from students who have successfully completed 
Internship I, or who are classified as in-service. Students will be expected to perform as- 
signed tasks independently. Students will complete a written project related to the work 
experience. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8876 Field Research 3 Credits 

Students completing data collection in the field for original research may enroll in this 
course, with permission. 

MSUS 8880 Master Thesis 3-6 Credits 

Advisement and completion of the mater's thesis. 

MSUS 8883 Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 5520) Exploration of pharmacological effects and medical 
uses of drugs and alcohol, the relationships between drugs and crime, the criminal justice 
system and government crime control policy. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8885 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 5530) Theories of juvenile delinquency, emphasizing socio- 
logical, biological and psychological factors. Modern trends and prevention. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8890 Pro-Seminar in Ethics and Criminal Justice 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 8801) Analysis of the criminal justice process and its agen- 
cies from prevention and arrest to release after incarceration. Emphasizes ethical dimen- 
sion of official decision- making. (3-0-3) 



75 



MSUS 8891 Law Enforcement Problems and Practices 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 8820) Current issues of policing and police administra- 
tion. Emphasizes police-society relationships, including those related to minorities, police 
unionization and corruption. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8892 Seminar in Juvenile Justice Administration 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 8850) Assessment of the policies and practices of agencies 
processing youthful offenders. Focus on impact of changing demographics on the process 
and system of juvenile justice. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8894 Institutional Incarceration and Treatment 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with CRJU 8840) Theory, purposes and practices of correctional institutions; 
gangs, AIDS and other problems in control treatment. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8895 Community Treatment and Services 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 8841) Probation and other community alternatives to in- 
carceration, their feasibility and effectiveness. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8896 Seminar in Law and Social Control 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU 8831) Jurisprudential paradigms, societal norms and sanc- 
tions, and prescriptive moral frameworks. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 8897 Topics in Law and Courts 3 Credits 

(Cross listed with AASU CRJU) In-depth analysis of selected topics in the role and opera- 
tion of law and courts in a system of ordered liberty. (3-0-3) 

MSUS 6000 Special Topics: 

Special topics courses will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues, such as planning issues in Savannah, to be addressed, as well as course offerings 
by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course will be taught as a regular course with several 
students attending the same classes and laboratories (if offered). If a given special topic 
is offered more than once per two-year period, it will be submitted for formal approval 
through regular university procedures. A course outline and syllabus will be submitted to 
and approved by the department chair prior to scheduling of course. 

MSUS 6100 Independent Study: 

Independent study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and 
the department chairperson prior to a student's enrollment in the course. A statement 
regarding the conditions and credit/semester limits under which the course may be re- 
peated must be clearly stated in the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 
9 credits). 



76 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

There are three categories of faculty membership: 

FULL GRADUATE FACULTY STATUS 

Dr. Bernita Berry 
Dr. Chellu S. Chetty 
Dr. Emily Crawford 
Dr. Babajidie Familoni 
Dr. Chandra Franklin 
Dr. Jane McBride Gates 
Dr. Shirley M. Geiger 
Dr. Matthew Gilligan 
Dr. William Hahn 
Dr. Behrooz Kalantari 
Dr. Daniel Lockwood 
Dr. Johnnie Dumas Myers 
Dr. Joseph Richardson 
Dr. Mostafa Sarhan 
Dr. Kenneth Sajwan 
Dr. Harpal Singh 
Dr. Malik Watkins 
Dr. George N. Williams 

ASSOCIATE GRADUATE FACULTY STATUS 

Dr. Haae Yeo Choi 

Dr. Mary Carla Curran 

Dr. Tarlochan S. Dhillon 

Dr. Dionne Hoskins 

Dr. Irma Browne Jamison 

Dr. Shinaz Jindani 

Dr. Willie Johnson 

Dr. George Joseph 

Dr. Jayaraman Kupupuswamy 

Dr. Carol Pride 

Dr. Aray Quandlous 

Dr. Hau Zhao 

ADJUNCT FACULTY STATUS 

Dr. Clark Alexander, Jr. 
Dr. Jack Blanton 
Dr. Jennifer Brofft 
Dr. Chunyan 
Dr. Marc Frischer 
Dr. Richard Lee 
Dr. Keith Maruya 
Dr. James Nelson 
Dr. James Sanders 
Dr. Peter Verity 



77 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar 6 

Academic Integrity 25 

Academic Policies and Procedures 24 

Academic Probation and Standing 33 

Accreditations 19 

Administrative Officers 20 

Administrative Withdrawal 31 

Admission Categories 30 

Admissions 26 

Advisement 31 

Affirmative Action 24 

Appeals and Grievances Procedures 33 

Application Deadlines 29 

Application Fee 29 

Application Process 29 

Audit 33 

Board of Regents 4 

Campus 16 

Certificate Programs 32 

College of Business Administration 21 

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 21 

College of Sciences and Technology 21 

Conference Courses 33 

Course Descriptions 58 

Course Load 31 

Departmental Admission Requirements 28 

Disabilities Services i 23 

Equal Access Policy 25 

Equal Opportunity 24 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 24 

Fees and Financial Policies 35 

Grade Appeals 33 

Grade Point Average 32 

Grading Policies 32 

Graduate Dean's Message 12 

Graduate Degrees 38 

Graduate Faculty and Administration 76 

Graduate Program Coordinators 22 

Graduate Programs 38 

Graduate Student Affairs Committee 33 

Graduate Studies 26 

Historical Overview 13 

Housing 37 

ID's 37 

Immunization 27 

In-Progress Grade 33 



78 



Independent Study 33 

International Students 29 

Location 15 

Marine Science 38 

Mission Statement 17 

Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research 22 

Office of Counseling and Disabilities Services 23 

Parking 37 

President's Message 11 

Provisional Admission 30 

Public Administration 44 

Reapplication 29 

Refund of Fees Policy 36 

Registration 31 

Regular Admission 30 

Repeated Courses 32 

Residency Requirement 27 

Right to Change Policies 24 

Security Report 24 

Senior Citizen Admission 27 

Sexual Harassment 25 

Schedule Changes 31 

Social Work 50 

Special Topics 33 

Student Affairs 23 

Table of Contents 5 

Time Limitation 31 

Transfer Credit 31 

Undergraduate Seniors 29 

University System of Georgia 2 

University System Officers and Staff 4 

Urban Studies 54 

Veterans 27 

Vocational Rehabilitation 27 



79 



NOTES 



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